Graduate Course Atlas

Spring 2019

555R (1277) Bio Sem

TH 4:00p-6:00p

Craig Hadley

Required for first through third year biological anthropology graduate students.

 

585 (1276) Race Violence and the State 

T 4:00p-7:00p

Justin Hosbey

The recurrent shooting deaths of unarmed Black men, women, and children have sparked several national conversations about the relationship between the police and Black communities in the United States. However, moral and political crises surrounding the use of violent repression against Black Americans have reverberated in American society since the nation’s inception – from the beginnings of racial slavery to its current afterlife (in the form of hyper-policing, racial profiling, police brutality, mass incarceration, et al.) Using ethnographic, historical, literary, psychoanalytical, and sociological texts, this course analyzes the complex relationship between racialization and state violence in the United States and other relevant transnational contexts. Students enrolled in the course will critically analyze and reflect on the historical and contemporary uses of “legitimized” state violence against Black people, the ways that this racial terror both corrodes and coheres American civil society, and the ways that Black communities and activists continue to resist this violent repression.
 
585 (2443) Colonialism / Neo-Colonialism 

F 10:00a-1:00p

Bayo Holsey

This seminar explores colonialism and, especially, its afterlives. We will consider works that delve into the structures, meanings, and experiences of the colonial project in different geographic spaces. We will also explore the nature of present-day structures of power and governmentality embedded in economic restructuring, international development, and humanitarianism. Themes will include contemporary forms of racialization, the role of state violence, the nature of post-colonial critique and activism, and possibilities of liberation. Course materials will span the disciplines of anthropology, history, and cultural criticism.

 
585 (2444) Evolution, Brain and Mind (Stout)

MW 11:30a-12:45p

Dietrich Stout

The purpose of the course is to provide an in-depth exploration of scientific approaches to the evolution of human intelligence. This includes the nature of the available evidence, established methods of investigation, and challenges faced by researchers. The focus is on integrating evidence and approaches from biological and cultural anthropology, archaeology, evolutionary biology and neuroscience. The course is taught in a seminar format.

 
585 (2483) Ethnography of Mind/Experience

Th 3:00p-6:00p

Chikako Ozawa-de Silva

This graduate seminar explores current ethnographic work on issues of mental well-being and mental illness in cross-cultural perspective, with a focus on global mental health, subjectivity, identity and selfhood, morality, disability, embodiment, and contemplative practice. This seminar is especially appropriate for, but not limited to, individuals interested in psychological and psychiatric anthropology. In recent years, anthropologists have been increasingly interested in exploring agency and internal subjective experience in addition to and in relation to social, political and economic structures. We will critically engage selected monographs to examine what these authors successfully accomplished from their ethnographic methods and conceptual approaches, and where they encountered limitations and challenges. The format of the seminar will include: (1) weekly presentations that are led by one or two students; (2) weekly responses to the class discussion and presentation from the previous week; (3) a final paper relevant to the course topic and the student’s research interests.

Fall 2018

ANT 500 (2704) - Proseminar in Anthropology

Carol Worthman

W 9:00-12:00

Anthropology 500 provides a graduate survey of the field of Anthropology, especially as practiced at Emory University. We begin with a brief introduction to some of the debates and issues surrounding the analytical scope, theories, and methods of the field. The bulk of the semester will be spent exploring how these wide-ranging approaches to Anthropology – epistemology, methodology, theory, and inter-disciplinarity – are reflected, translated, and applied in Anthropological research. These engagements with scholarship will be enacted in several forms: (1) a pro-seminar, in which various faculty members of the Emory Anthropology Department visit the class to present and discuss their ‘sub-field’ of anthropology and their own scholarly research; (2) weekly précis papers summarizing a selected text from the assigned readings; (3) individual research projects (annotated bibliographies as well as a more integrative ‘review essay’) engaging a range of theories and methodological approaches within their chosen area of scholarship.  Students are also strongly encouraged to attend scholarly presentations sponsored within the department as well as related campus talks, seminars and workshops as they arise over the course of the semester. Only students registered in the Anthropology PhD program may enroll. All enrollments are processed through Anthropology.

 

ANT 501 (2705) - History of Anthropological Thought

Robert Paul

T 3:00-6:00

This course traces some of the main trends in the history of theory in socio-cultural anthropology since the field’s origins in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.  It begins with a consideration of the Victorian-era thinkers such as Tylor, Morgan, Spencer, and Frazer, and then continues with a discussion of Boas and Durkheim, the two great modernizers of the field.  Durkheim’s influence in France continues through Mauss, Levi-Strauss, and Bourdieu; and in England through Malinowski and Radcliffe-Brown to Evans-Pritchard, Victor Turner, and Mary Douglas; while in America several different schools branch out from under the influence of Boas and his immediate successors such as Kroeber and Lowie: first there are Benedict and Mead, whose influence leads to latter day symbolic  anthropology as represented by Geertz, Schneider and others; then there is the important school of cultural materialism and evolution leading from Leslie White and Julian Steward to Marvin Harris, Roy Rappaport, and others; the impact of feminist theory of anthropology represented by figures such as Sherry Ortner, Michelle Rosaldo, and others; and finally the post-modern turn, represented by James Clifford, George Marcus, and Michael Fischer.

 

ANT 555R (2706) - Research Seminar in Biological Anthropology

Staff

Th 4:00-5:00

Required for first- through third-year biological anthropology graduate students.

 

ANT 560 (2707) - Methods in Cultural Anthropology

Bruce Knauft

M 6:00-9:00

This course explores methods of ethnographic fieldwork, proposal writing, and ethnographic write-up and representation in anthropology. The course is designed for first and second year graduate students in cultural anthropology who intend to conduct long-term ethnographic doctoral research in a field setting. The course construes “methods” as the professional skills associated with conducting and completing doctoral fieldwork, on the one hand, and issues of writing and representation before, during, and following fieldwork, on the other. This includes techniques and methods used to collect information in the field, as well as the configuration and analysis of information for purposes of proposal writing, write-up, and various forms of media representation. The course considers pilot studies, proposal writing, full fieldwork, and subsequent write-up as stages of professional development that are integrally linked and yet in important ways disjoined or disjunctive in our lived experience as researchers.

The course draws heavily on the specific research agendas and field plans of the individual students taking the course. Classes are structured in a seminar format that privileges engaged discussion, student presentation, and instructor analysis and commentary on student projects, both individually and collectively. Reading includes selected classic and recent works concerning ethnographic methods, fieldwork, and ethnographic writing as well as successful field work funding proposals written in previous years by students and faculty. Major attention is given to student proposal writing. The course is not designed as a survey or literature review of available works concerrning field methods or ethnography. The goal is to critically cultivate strategies whereby students can successfully implement and carry out their own doctoral field research projects.      

Students interested in taking this course should contact the instructor in advance concerning their research interests, including how these may be engaged with the course materials and structure.

The course is designed primarily for anthropology graduate students. Students not intending to conduct long term ethnographic fieldwork as part of their doctoral research should contact the instructor before enrolling.

 

ANT 585-001 (2708) - Biosocial Perspectives on Human Health and Well-being

Craig Hadley

MW 2:30-3:45

In this seminar-style course we will examine the ways that biological, biocultural, and biosocial anthropologists in particular and health and social scientists more generally have addressed the question of why some people are healthier than others. We will then examine how these theories have been applied to understand the distribution of infectious, chronic, mental, and nutritional diseases in low and high-income settings. Within each set of readings, we will also focus on how theory is linked to method, what constitutes evidence, the extent to which pathways are explicitly identified by each theory, and the strengths, weaknesses, and points of overlap with other theoretical perspectives.  The course fulfills a graduate biological anthropology credit.

 

ANT 585-002 (4538) - From Landmarks to Revisions

Karen Stolley

W 1:00-4:00

Crosslisted with the History Department.

 

ANT 585-003 (4733) - Brazil in Transnational Perspective

Ruben Oliven, Emory Fulbright Distinguished Chair of Brazilian Studies

F 9:00-12:00

This seminar will focus on crucial aspects of the building of the Brazilian nation, showing how for the past five hundred years the country’s economy, population, and culture have been constantly interacting with the rest of the globe. Using anthropological and sociological studies, we will analyze distinct aspects of the construction of modern Brazil as manifested in images and self-representations, race and ethnicity, regionalism and revival of tradition, individualism, gender and sexuality, urbanization, violence, popular culture, money and consumption, transnationalization of culture.

 

ANT 585 - Gaming with the Gods: Digital Approaches to the Study of Religion

Sandra Blakely

W 1:00-4:00

Digital tools for the exploration of human behavior offer insights into group formation, individual agency, human landscapes and geospatial expansion; applied to historical contexts, they raise the potential to integrate the modeling of available data with simulations in real time. In this seminar we will explore the contemporary landscape and the heuristic potential of digital pathways in the investigation of religion, from gaming applications to network analysis and geographic information systems. Participants do not need prior experience in programming or digital systems; our weekly meetings will explore the state of the disciplines, case studies, and the history of spatial and network analysis of human systems, and the use of ‘serious games’ to respond to real-world crises.  Each participant’s semester project will consist of the identification of digital pathways appropriate for a specific question in the history of religions, and the initiation of training and development to enable its continuing development.

 

RLR 700 – Ethnography of Religious Experience
Don Seeman
Wednesday, 11:00-2:00


The question of ethics has long been central to ethnographic practice. Early anthropological works by Herskovitz, Boas and others developed the contested notion of cultural relativism as a corrective to Western moral arrogance or misunderstanding of various societies. But cultural relativism led to many problems of its own, including a failure to recognize the ways in which anthropologists and their subjects share a common moral world or face common moral dilemmas. Recently, the “Anthropology of Everyday Ethics” has generated a plethora of new ethnographic works by Michael Lambeck, James Laidlaw, Jarret Zigon, Veena Das and others devoted to the notion of “everyday ethics” grounded in social practice rather than consideration of abstract rules -- often in conversation with Wittgenstein, Levinas or Aristotle. Joel Robbins has recently critiqued some of these works for neglecting the “transcendent” domain associated with religious institutions and practices. The anthropology of religion, meanwhile, has been oriented for some time around questions of habituation and local moral experience that ought to be better integrated with the anthropology of ethics literature and moral thinking more broadly. This new seminar is devoted to a critical reading of the anthropology of ethics genre, with special attention to the anthropology of religion. How can undeniable diversity of cultures be reconciled with the perception of transcendent ethical rules or natural law? Can a renewed engagement with moral philosophy enrich ethnography by alerting it to problems in everyday experience that may have been neglected in recent decades? And how can ethnography humanize fields like bioethics that have had difficulty accommodating the diversity of moral intuitions represented by different cultures and religious traditions?

Required Texts Include:
Webb Keane, Ethical Life: Its Natural and Social Histories
James Laidlaw, The Subject of Virtue: An Anthropology of Ethics and Freedom
Cheryl Mattingly, Moral Laboratories: Family Peril and the Struggle for a Good Life
Saba Mahmood, Politics of Piety
Omri Elisha, Moral Ambition
Michael Lambeck, Ordinary Ethics: Anthropology, Language and Action

Spring 2018

ANT 503 (1253) - Evolutionary Processes

Dietrich Stout

MW 1:00-2:15

This course aims to situate the study of human adaptation and evolution within the broader theoretical framework of evolutionary biology. We will cover core issues including genetics, phylogenetics, natural selection, sexual selection, behavioral ecology, life history evolution, the evolution of development, and gene-culture co-evolution using examples drawn from both ancient and recent human evolution. Required for doctoral students in Anthropology.

ANT 585/MBC 700 (1254) ¿ Evolution of Childhood

Melvin Konner

Th 6:00-9:00 PM

This course will cover the evolutionary and anatomical foundations of psychological, especially social and emotional, development, as well as comparative socialization and cross-cultural varieties of enculturation. We will read the instructor¿s new book on the subject, which has four major sections (evolution, maturation, socialization, enculturation) and a concluding section. Among the topics covered will be relevant parts of: life history theory, evolution of ontogeny, evolutionary developmental psychology, neural and neuroendocrine development from fetal life through puberty and parenthood, comparative socialization with an emphasis on primates and other mammals, early experience effects, stress responses in animal models and children, hunter-gatherer childhood as the human cultural baseline, cross-cultural comparisons of childhood and childrearing, theories of culture and personality, cultural evolution, human universals, and a proposed ¿culture acquisition device¿ common to all (normal) human brains and minds. Among the questions we will consider are: How did parent-offspring conflict figure in human evolution? What in social and emotional development depends as much or more on ¿postnatal neuroembryology¿ as on experience? How do socialization and enculturation differ? What are our legacies from mammalian, primate, ape, and earlier hominin development? Is ¿maternal sentiment¿ a human universal? Is culture unique to humans? How do genetic and cultural evolution interact? Are there commonalities of process at varied levels of analysis such as evolution, brain development, learning, socialization, and enculturation? And, finally, what are the unique features of human childhood?

Prerequisites: None.

Text: Konner, Melvin. The Evolution of Childhood: Relationships, Emotion, Mind (Harvard University Press, 2010)

Additional Weekly readings: Journal articles to be determined. The text of the book was completed in 2009, and one key goal of the course will be to read studies and review papers bringing each topic up to date.

Requirements: Class participation, oral presentations, and a final paper. Written work should look critically at topics in the book and even argue with it.

ANT 585 (1255) ¿ Evolution of Human Subsistence

Jessica Thompson

F 11:00-2:00

This course examines human nutrition and subsistence behavior from an evolutionary perspective. It begins with human nutritional literature and discussions of our biological requirements, then moves into comparison of modern human dietary ecology with those of other primates, especially our closest living relatives, the great apes. We then turn to literature that demonstrates the methods and theoretical approaches that are currently used to reconstruct past diets. As we begin to follow the evidence for changes in subsistence in the hominin lineage, case studies using these methods will be integrated into discussions of how we know what we do about past nutrition. The course will spend time on key issues and debates such as changes from closed-habitat to open-habitat foraging, the origins of meat-eating, the role of extractive foraging in human social systems, variation in hunter-forager subsistence systems, the origins of domestication, and the phenomenon of fad diets in industrialized nations. The course will be delivered in a seminar-style format, with key readings each week that follow topical themes, with assessment based on in-class participation, critical essays, and a final research project.

ANT 585 (1257) ¿ Decolonization Theory and Practice

Debra Vidali

W 2:30-5:30

This graduate seminar focuses on theories and practices that shift and challenge conventional Western modes of intellectual production and research. Drawing on contemporary interdisciplinary scholarship as well as critiques from within anthropology, we will consider the ways in which imperialism, structures of inequality, and settler mentalities are potentially embedded within academic knowledge practices. Issues of positionality, intent, responsibility, ethics, and voice in research, as well as questions about genres of research communication loom large in these debates. We will learn about (and practice) non-Western anthropologies, Indigenous anthropologies, African anthropologies, ¿epistemologies of the South,¿ and other ways of knowing/doing research. In addition, we will explore how practitioners of applied anthropology, public anthropology, participatory action research, and multi-modal ethnography provide models for decolonizing research. Readings under consideration include work by Linda Tuhiwai Smith, Faye V. Harrison, Trinh Minh-ha, Audre Lorde, Vine Deloria, J. K¿haulani Kauanui, Eduardo Kohn, Mariana Mora, and Mark Rifkin.

ANT 585 (4260) ¿ Anthropology and Psychoanalysis

Robert A. Paul

W 6:00¿9:00 PM

Just over a century ago Freud published his book Totem and Taboo, launching a dialogue, or debate, about the relations between psychoanalysis and anthropology that has waxed and waned but continues to this day. Both disciplines seek to go beyond ordinary perspective on the world, anthropology in breadth, through cross-cultural awareness, psychoanalysis in depth, through the exploration of the unconscious mind and its fantasies.  But are they compatible, and if so, how? That is the question. This seminar provides an overview of some of the most important theoretical and ethnographic contributions to this intellectual conundrum, examining the work of leading contributors to the literature who have tried to apply psychoanalysis to anthropology and/or vice versa. Some of the authors to be considered include classic authorities such as Geza Roheim, Bronislaw Malinowski, Ernest Jones, Georges Devereux, Abram Kardiner, Karen Horney, and John Whiting; along with more recent thinkers such as Alan Dundes  Jean Briggs, Melford Spiro, Gananath Obeyesekere, Waud Kracke, Vincent Crapanzano, John Ingham, Nancy Chodorow,  Douglas Hollan, Kate Schechter, and others.  

CPLT 751/ANT 585-006 (5193) - Experiments in Scholarly Form

Angelika Bammer and Anna Grimshaw

T 4:00-7:00 PM

Established forms of scholarly inquiry often appear immutable.  The peer reviewed essay, the monograph, the conference presentation have long served as professional markers in the academy.  But the rise of new fields of inquiry, coupled with a growing dissatisfaction within existing fields, have put pressure on the traditional forms through which scholarship is pursued.  While such pressure is sometimes experienced negatively, as a problem of academic legitimation, this course explores how this moment can be productive -- an occasion for innovation and creativity.

Drawing on a series of case studies, we examine ways of pursuing intellectual inquiry that extend beyond the conventional forms of scholarly representation.  In particular, we consider experiments in a variety of genres and media, focusing on text-based (memoir, dialogue, essay, diary), image-based (photo-essay, film), and hybrid (comic book) forms. 

The goal of this course is threefold: (1) Students will learn to critically assess the possibilities and limitations of conventional forms in their fields; (2) They will experiment with new forms of scholarly presentation in the context of their own research; (3) They will learn to make a case that effectively situates innovation in the context of their scholarly work.

Materials include:  Bammer, A. and Boetcher Joeres, R-E.  The Future of Scholarly Writing (2015);  Berger, J and Mohr, J. A Seventh Man (1975);  Steedman, C.  Landscape for a Good Woman (1986); Gardner, Robert Forest of Bliss (1996); Stewart, K. Ordinary Affects (2007); Sousanis, Nick, Unflattening (2015).

ANT 585-010 (6114) - Anthropology and Law

Michael Peletz

W 4:00-7:00

This seminar examines anthropology¿s engagement with law and law-like phenomena in the 21st century. It is geared toward graduate students and advanced undergraduates who intend to pursue (or have already conducted) research on topics ranging from human rights, humanitarianism, gender inequities, and sex trafficking to mass incarceration, racialized state violence, and social justice. Throughout the course we will examine regimes of knowledge, power, and governance, and why, as many scholars claim, the rise of neoliberal globalization has typically gone hand in hand with a punitive turn both in legal arenas and in more expansive cultural-political domains. One of the more general goals of the course is to explore how contemporary discourses and practices bearing on crime, risk, security, and policing illuminate new forms of sovereignty and citizenship as well as recent transformations in the relationships linking capital, governance, and the state.

ANT 585-008 (5308) Crosslisted with HIST 585/HISP 710/JS 730R - (Im)migrants, Ethnicities, and Identities in Latin America

Jeffrey Lesser

T 9:00-12:00

Latin America (in its both contemporary and historical geographies) has received large numbers of (im)migrants.  Some came by choice, often with religious and/or economic goals.  Others were forced migrants, working on the plantations and mines that formed the basis of the exploitative colonial economy. In the nineteenth century, (im)migration came to play a critical economic, social and political role in the newly formed nations of Latin America.  At times (im)migrants were viewed as saviors and their entrance was encouraged by elites.  In other moments anti-(im)migrant movements and legislation were widespread.  As time passed, some of the descendants of those who migrated to and within Latin America re-migrated, at times to other American countries, at times to new continents. This course will put human movement into conversation with the creation of racial, ethnic and national identities in Latin America. We will analyze the history of racial and ethnic discourses and their sociopolitical uses in the formation of modern nations and empires.  We will examine postcolonial societies and their constant tension with the legacies of (im)migration.  An important goal of the course is to examine questions, themes and methods which in turn can be linked to each student¿s own research project.

ANT 585-007 (5216) Crosslisted with HIST 585/WGS 585 - Subaltern Studies

Gyanendra Pandey

Th 1:00-4:00

See history.emory.edu for course description.

ANT 585/HISP 730 - Topics in Intercultural Discourse and Translation: Intercultural Communication

Xochitl Marsilli-Vargas

Wednesday 4:00pm-7:00pm

This course is an intensive introduction to the study of communication as a cultural system and speech as socially embedded communicative practice. It is designed for those wishing to gain enough background in theories of contact and communication to critically understand the place of language in social interaction. It is designed for graduate students; upper level undergraduates are welcome to enroll, with permission of the instructor. There are no special prerequisites.

Topics include (among many): How does culture influence the communication process? What is the relation between culture, communication, and identity? How do various societal factors (economics, mass media, religion) influence intercultural communication?

ANT 555R ¿ Research Seminar in Biological Anthropology

Craig Hadley

Th 4:00-5:00

Required for first through third year biological anthropology graduate students.

Fall 2017

ANT 500 (2133) - Proseminar in Anthropology

Peter Brown

Fri 9:00-12:00

Anthropology 500 provides a graduate introduction to the field of Anthropology, especially as practiced here at Emory University.  We begin with a brief introduction to some of the debates and issues surrounding the analytical scope, theories, and methods of the field of Anthropology. The bulk of the semester will be spent exploring how these wide ranging approaches to Anthropology, epistemology, methodology, theory, and inter-disciplinarity are reflected, translated, and applied in Anthropological research. These engagements with Anthropological scholarship will be enacted in several forms: (1) a pro-seminar, in which various faculty members of the Emory Anthropology Department visit the class to present and discuss their `sub-field¿ of anthropology and their own scholarly research; (2) weekly précis papers summarizing a selected text from the assigned readings; (3) individual research projects (annotated bibliographies as well as a more integrative `review essay¿) engaging a range of theories and methodological approaches within their chosen area of scholarship.  Students are also strongly encouraged to attend scholarly presentations sponsored within the department as well as related campus talks, seminars and workshops as they arise over the course of the semester. In sum, the course engages new members of the field in ongoing conversations and debates about the big questions, competing perspectives, and telling insights of anthropology.

Particulars: Only students registered in the Anthropology PhD program may enroll. All enrollments are processed through Anthropology.

ANT 504 (2138) - Agrarian Transformation

Peggy Barlett

TTh 10:00-11:15 am

Cultural anthropology for over sixty years has described and analyzed lifeways in agrarian societies, from small tribal groups to hydraulic empires and corporate agribusiness, from rice paddies to dryland pastures to craft cheese producers. This body of work is now foundational for current debates about sustainable food systems, resilience approaches to climate change, and political strategies to address inequality and control over land, water, and other resources. Classical anthropological work on smallholder production, gender and household decision-making, population growth, and new forms of consumption intersects with contemporary debates about industrial agriculture and agro-ecology, post-industrial development and corporate capitalisms, and forms of resistance that include the Via Campesina, Landless People¿s Movement, food sovereignty, and market-based certifications such as Fair Trade. This course will use a series of ethnographies and readings from theoretical works to explore the threads of cultural ecology, economic anthropology, household decision-making, development studies, political economy, and emerging sustainability perspectives.  Delving into classic and contemporary anthropological works, the class will explore trends and tensions in bioregionalism/globalization, peasantries/post-peasants, and agrarian social movements. The course will be useful for students preparing to do research in agrarian societies and students will have an opportunity to tailor an independent research project to their own interests. 

Readings: Many issues will be explored in articles or book chapters, but in addition we will read:

Paxson, The Life of Cheese: Crafting Food and Value in America. California.

Boserup, The Conditions of Agricultural Growth: The Economies of Agrarian Change under Population Pressure. 

Netting, Smallholders, Householders: Farm Families and the Ecology of Intensive, Sustainable Agriculture.  Stanford.

Wolf, Europe and the People without History. California.

Barth, Nomads of South Persia. Waveland Press.

Wilk and Cliggett, Economies and Cultures: Foundations of Economic Anthropology. Westview. Second edition.

Barlett, Agrarian Dreams, Rural Realities: Family Farms in Crisis.  North Carolina.

Mintz, Sweetness and Power: The Place of Sugar in Modern History. Penguin.

Particulars

Oral and written demonstration of understanding of course materials and creative use of those materials in periodic integrative essays, and a research paper engaging course materials with an ethnographic problem or region of the student¿s choice.

ANT 510 (2145) - Medical Anthropology

Chikako Ozawa-de Silva

T 3:00-6:00 pm

This course is designed as an introduction to medical anthropology. The course is organized thematically and examines some of the important issues in contemporary medical anthropology, including: Illness, disease and sickness; illness as metaphor of socio-cultural distress; the process of medicalization; current paradigm shift in biomedicine; culture-bound syndromes; ¿naturalizing¿ processes; contestation for medical legitimacy in plural societies; non-western medical systems; body and mind in illness and healing; cross-cultural psychiatric anthropology; infectious disease and inequality; power/knowledge and medical practices; and ambiguity in death and dying in the era of high technology. This course will explore the role of medicine in our society, how anthropological analysis can be applicable in understanding the complexity of human conditions such as health, illness and sickness, physical and mental pain, suffering, death and dying.

Texts (Required and Suggested):

Anne Fadiman, The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down

Peter J. Brown, Understanding and Applying Medical Anthropology

Arthur Kleinman, Illness Narratives

Margaret Lock, Twice Dead: Organ Transplants and the Reinvention of Death

Susan Sontag, Illness as metaphor and AIDS and its Metaphors

Daniel Moerman, Meaning, Medicine and the ¿Placebo Effect¿

Michel Foucault, The Birth of the Clinic

Nancy Scheper-Hughes, Death Without Weeping

Daniel Goleman, Destructive Emotions

Chikako Ozawa-de Silva, Psychotherapy and Religion in Japan

Carolyn F. Sargent and Thomas M. Johnson, Medical Anthropology

Byron Good, Medicine, Rationality, and Experience

Paul Farmer, Infections and Inequality

Tanya Luhrmann, Of Two Minds

ANT 555R (2151) ¿ Research Seminar in Biological Anthropology

Th 4:00-5:00 pm

Required for first through third year biological anthropology graduate students.

 

ANT 585-001 (2154) - Infrastructure & Information: Ethnographies of Global/Local Media

Jenny Chio

M 11:30-2:30 pm

This seminar will explore the tensions and elasticity of media as a simultaneously local and global mode of sociality and politics. Through close readings of contemporary media and visual culture theory, alongside ethnographies of media infrastructures (production, circulation, and consumption), we will examine how media forms and media technologies engage and engender particular ways of being in/knowing the world that are equally specific to local contexts and expressions of global connectivity and potentialities. Moreover, this approach forces us to confront often taken for granted assumptions about media ¿ as information, as knowledge, as constitutive of citizenship and relatedness. ¿Media¿ for our purposes will encompass a range of technologies and types, including television, radio, film, photography, print, and online; state-sponsored, commercial, underground, and independent; verbal, visual, and interactive. Seminar discussions will challenge us to consider media both as a text and as a social context, with a particular emphasis on developing productive methodological connections and analytical insights between approaches in cultural anthropology, film and media studies, and visual culture.  Topics to be addressed include the ethnographies of journalism and newsmaking, media infrastructures and public culture, "local" film industries (Nollywood, Bollywood, Ghanaian video films) and global circuits, soundscapes and radio, and histories of looking, witnessing, and documenting.

ANT 585-002 (2156) ¿ Kinship and Marriage

Robert Paul

W 5:00-8:00 pm

The study of kinship was once the central concern of anthropology; it then fell out of favor after several notable deconstructive critiques, but more recently has re-emerged as an area of both theoretical and ethnographic concern. Contemporary approaches to the study of kinship and marriage have been strongly inflected by the impact of such powerful but widely diverse theoretical discourses as gender and LGBTQ studies, contemporary evolutionary theory, cultural studies, and others, and by developments such as the rise of new reproductive technologies and of non-traditional forms of marriage in western society. The course will address both some enduring classical ideas as well as examples drawn from the recent literature. Topics to be covered will revolve around important problems and debates that have marked the field, such as the questions of descent versus alliance theory. group marriage, incest prohibitions, polyandry, adoption, the matrilineal puzzle, kinship in the era of reproductive technology,  the role of biological relatedness and its relationship to social kinship, and ultimately the question of "what is kinship anyway?". These issues will be examined both in theory and through ethnographic examples.

ANT 585-003 (2165) ¿ Statistical Methods

Adrian Jaeggi

TTh 11:20-12:45 pm

ANT 585-004 (2167) ¿ Lives: Anthropology of Human Experience

Carol Worthman

MW 10:00-11:15 am

Anthropology aims to tap the diversity of human conditions and experiences, where they come from and how they matter. This ambitious, rather daunting mission drives an urgent and valuable quest for human understanding, now more than ever.  For any single study, the anthropologist necessarily brings a specific focus to a particular time and place where dynamics or conditions are in play that may illuminate a larger question, such as "What fuels the global sweep of Pentecostalism?", "Does schooling transform socialization, and with what cultural effects?", "How are identities forged in an unsettled age?", "Why is there a global obesity epidemic, and what does it 'mean'?", or "What is the impact of e-media on relationships?"

This course explores epistemological and methodological approaches to navigate the gaps between grand distal questions and gritty proximal realities. It engages multiple avenues of inquiry oriented to tapping everyday experience as the grounds where the "rubber" of societies meets the "road" of human lives. Readings, discussions, and exercises aim to build conceptual and research skills to address thorny challenges such as the following: How do we capture the specific dynamics at play among particular sets of people at specific moments and situations that will critically test and inform or re-form our thinking? Further, how do we adequately situate such specifics in the larger contexts (cultural, structural, ecological, political) that inform them? How do we stay close to lived realities with their multi-layered meanings and motives? How do we tap and represent the unspoken, perhaps even unconscious, elements that hold significance for value and meaning, life chances and trajectories, or well-being and health? The underlying approach to human diversity taken in this course privileges differences that make a difference.

Topics:

Being there: the value of being present

Place and space: Mapping physical and perceived landscapes

      What comprises the study population or community?

      Physical ecologies (physical geography, properties)

            Candice Odgers, Robert Sampson

      Social ecologies (purposes, meanings, signification of places) Victor Turner, B Whiting

Demographics

      Households, other units of residential organization (Bledsoe, Johnson-Hanks, JH Jones)

A day in the life: daily schedules and routines

      Levels: community, household, individual (age, gender)

      Weisner, Lowe

Activity

      Behavior observation (vs. observant participation) (Borgerhoff Mulder)

      Actigraphy and mobile tech (GPS)

      Daily routines, household routines  (Elinor Ochs, DeCaro)

      Settings and companions (B Whiting)

      Sleep (Worthman, Hollan)

Experience

      Perception  (Bateson, Desjarlais, Evan Thompson, Bitbol)

      Emotion  (Lutz, Feldman Barrett, HL Meisselman)

            Experience sampling techniques (Odgers; http://qwantify.org)

            Biosensors (Dina Katabi NETMIT)

      Phenomenology

Person-centered interviewing (Doug Hollan 2005, Hollan & Throop 2012)

Trusting the Subject? Anthony Jack, Andreas Roepstorff. 2003.

Working cultural logic

      Rashomon and the use of triangulation (narratives: R Rosaldo, Ilongot Headhunting) Holland

      Cynosures: when stats don't tell the whole story (Borgerhoff-Mulder)

Relationships, roles and statuses (Hruschka)

Embodiment and body as lens

      Quantitative

            Biomeasures (anthropometry, biomarkers) (Worthman, biomarker logic)

            Surveys: cross-cultural "translation"; participant-led indicators (Kohrt; Weaver & Kaiser)

      Qualitative

            The curious value of self-rated health

            Phenomenological approaches (per above)

Why experiment?

Life history in four dimensions

      Autobiographical (Shostak)

      Biographical  (Biel, Robbins)

      Developmental  (Harkness & Super, Pope-Edwards)

      Evolutionary/design affordances and constraints  (Kaplan & Gurven/Tsimane, Kuzawa/Cebu)

Perils of the panopticon

      AAA on ethics (ethics statements)

      Ethics for present anthropology

RLR 700/ANT 585 - Ethnography, Everyday Ethics and Moral Thought

Don Seeman

W 12:00-3:00 pm

The question of ethics has long been central to ethnographic practice. Early anthropological works by Herskovitz, Boas and others developed the contested notion of cultural relativism as a corrective to Western moral arrogance or misunderstanding of various societies. But cultural relativism led to many problems of its own, including a failure to recognize the ways in which anthropologists and their subjects share a common moral world or face common moral dilemmas. Recently, the ¿Anthropology of Everyday Ethics¿ has generated a plethora of new ethnographic works by Michael Lambeck, James Laidlaw, Jarret Zigon, Veena Das and others devoted to the notion of ¿everyday ethics¿ grounded in social practice rather than consideration of abstract rules--often in conversation with Wittgenstein, Levinas or Aristotle.

Joel Robbins has recently critiqued some of these works for neglecting the ¿transcendent¿ domain associated with religious institutions and practices. The anthropology of religion, meanwhile, has been oriented for some time around questions of habituation and local moral experience that ought to be better integrated with the anthropology of ethics literature and moral thinking more broadly.

This new seminar is devoted to a critical reading of the anthropology of ethics genre, with special attention to the anthropology of religion. How can undeniable diversity of cultures be reconciled with the perception of transcendent ethical rules or natural law? Can a renewed engagement with moral philosophy enrich ethnography by alerting it to problems in everyday experience that may have been neglected in recent decades? And how can ethnography humanize fields like bioethics that have had difficulty accommodating the diversity of moral intuitions represented by different cultures and religious traditions?

Required Texts Include:
Webb Keane, Ethical Life: Its Natural and Social Histories
James Laidlaw, The Subject of Virtue: An Anthropology of Ethics and Freedom
Cheryl Mattingly, Moral Laboratories: Family Peril and the Struggle for a Good Life
Saba Mahmood, Politics of Piety
Omri Elisha, Moral Ambition
Michael Lambeck, Ordinary Ethics: Anthropology, Language and Action

 

ANT 797R: Directed Study

 

ANT 798R: Advanced Research

 

ANT 799R: Dissertation Research

Spring 2017

ANT 507-000 [1241]: Human Biology

Carol Worthman

TuTh 11:30¿12:45

The course focuses on human biology as studied through the lens of anthropology, and aims to empower the student to think substantively, comparatively, and creatively about it.  During the semester we will apply cultural, ecological and adaptationist perspectives to examine the interactions of social and biological factors in determining the causes and consequences of human variation, particularly in the production of differential well-being and experience.  We first will examine foundational constructs such as life history, adaptation and trade-offs, ecocultural pathways, and cultural models. Then we turn to human development as a key to understanding how these constructs operate in the course of a life to yield differential outcomes. We move on to review a set of core body functions ¿ reproductive, energetics, cardiovascular, immune, neuroendocrine, and central nervous system ¿ alongside exemplars of major insights from human biology into how these functions are shaped by human experience and ecology (e.g., workloads, malnutrition, inequality). Thence we will trace how these effects translate into differential mental and physical health. A subtheme concerns measures and methods for pursuit of transdisciplinary biocultural studies with humans ¿in the wild¿. We also review a series of field research programs that represent contemporary work.

Texts:

E. P. Widmaier, H. Raff, K. T. Strang. Vander¿s Human Physiology. New York: McGraw Hill.

Weekly articles from multiple primary and secondary sources.

Particulars:  Classes follow a seminar format, including some structured input from the instructor as well as student presentations. Requirements include 3 presentations and short write-ups, and a single final paper.

***

ANT 508-000 [3820]: Culture and Mind

Bradd Shore

MW 1:00-2:15

Culture and Mind considers the place of public cultural institutions and culturally-derived knowledge in a general theory of mind. A synthesis of traditional Symbolic Anthropology and Cognitive Anthropology, the course deals with the relationship between the content of cultural knowledge and the forms in which it is encoded. The course attempts to bridge the ¿objectivist¿ view of culture as public institutions and artifacts ¿in the world¿ with the ¿experientialist¿ vision of culture as cognitive models ¿in the mind.¿  Readings will draw from the classic literature in cognitive and symbolic anthropology, as well as more recent work from anthropology on cultural models and related work in psychology and linguistics.  The focal topics in the course are:

  • A cognitively nuanced conception of culture.
  • The evolutionary history of the modern human mind
  • The psychic unity doctrine and its implications for anthropology.
  • Culture and memory: collective/social Memory
  • The social distribution of cultural knowledge.
  • Activity Theory: cultural learning and practice.
  • The body in the mind: The role of embodiment in cultural knowledge. 
  • Culture, rationality and the problem of ¿primitive thought¿
  • The origins of belief: How cultural knowledge becomes shared and credible.
  • Narrative and Meaning construction.

Readings

Books

  • Bahloul, Joelle, The Architecture of Memory: A Jewish-Muslim Household in Colonial Algeria, 1937-1962
  • Bruner, Jerome, Acts of Meaning
  • Connerton, Paul, How Societies Remember
  • Donald, Merlin, The Origins of the Modern Mind
  • Hutchins, Edwin, Cognition in the Wild
  • Johnson, Mark, The Body in the Mind: The Bodily Basis of Meaning, Imagination, and Reason
  • Lave, Jean, and Etienne Wenger, Situated Learning: Legitimate Peripheral Participation
  • Levi-Strauss, Claude, The Savage Mind
  • Luhrmann, Tanya, Persuasions of the Witches¿ Craft
  • Schieffelin, Edward, The Sorrow of the Lonely and the Burning of the Dancers
  • Shore, Bradd, Culture in Mind: Meaning Construction and Cultural Cognition
  • Strauss, Claudia and Naomi Quinn, A Cognitive Theory of Cultural Meaning

Papers

  • Boas, Franz, The Mind of Primitive Man, Chaps. 10, 11
  • Geertz, Clifford, ¿The Growth of Culture and the Evolution of Mind¿
  • Levy-Bruhl, Lucien, from How Natives Think
  • Littleton, C. Scott, "Levy-Bruhl and the Concept of Cognitive Relativity"
  • Shore, Bradd ¿Human Nature and Human Variation: The Unnatural History of a False Dichotomy¿

***

ANT 585-000 [1243]: Special Topics: Theory and Ethnography in the New Millennium

Michael Peletz

MW 2:30-3:45

This course examines trends in ethnography and socio-cultural theory since the turn of the new millennium. We will focus both on the new directions that anthropologists are endeavoring to map out as well as continuities in the theory and practice of fieldwork and the anthropological enterprise more generally since the latter part of the 20th century.

One of our points of departure will be the two-fold argument that, for a number of reasons having to do mostly with the nature of the current world order, ¿fieldwork is not what it used to be¿; and that new modes of engagement with our interlocutors in the (variably defined) ¿field¿ are therefore both necessary and desirable. Course readings will focus on book-length ethnographies that, taken collectively, demonstrate an important range of contemporary engagements with themes addressed by foundational theorists such as Weber, Gramsci, Foucault, and Bourdieu. Topics to be explored include different understandings of ¿engaged¿ anthropology¿; different approaches to understanding and writing about the ways in which variably gendered and sexed subjects are embodied; and the contributions that anthropology can make to our understanding of contemporary societies and cultures in relation to processes of modernity and neoliberal globalization. One of the more general objectives of the course is to help students develop an understanding of anthropology¿s relevance in the new millennium.

***

ANT 585-001 [2852]: Special Topics: Evolution of the Human Brain and Cognition

Dietrich Stout

MW 1:00-2:15

The purpose of the course is to provide an in-depth exploration of scientific approaches to the evolution of human intelligence. This is an inherently interdisciplinary undertaking and our focus will be on integrating evidence and approaches from fields including biological and cultural anthropology, comparative psychology, archaeology, evolutionary biology and neuroscience. Special attention will be paid to the nature of the available evidence, established methods of investigation, and challenges faced by researchers. The course is taught in a seminar format. There is one required text; other assigned reading will be available as PDF files.

***

ANT 585-002 [3853]: Special Topics: Mixed Methods Research in Anthropology

Craig Hadley

TuTh 1:00-2:15

This course is designed for graduate students who are interested in undertaking original systematic research in anthropology. The course aims to supply students with a tool kit of techniques that range across the exploratory to the confirmatory spectrum. Through a hands-on approach we will cover topics including but not limited to: sampling, research ethics, freelisting and other semi structured data collection techniques, pile sorting, triad tests, time allocation, the design and delivery of surveys, the construction and assessment of scales, data management, cultural consensus modeling, text analysis, and some very basic statistical techniques.  This is not a course on ethnographic methods nor is a course on statistics; it best described as a course on the design and analysis of systematic mixed methods projects in anthropology.

***

ANT 585-003 [3854]: Special Topics: Development and Change

Peter Little

TUESDAYS 4:00-7:00

There are few contemporary topics that invoke as many polarizing opinions and emotions as that of development.  While it remains a contested field, it continues to attract considerable scholarly and applied interest in anthropology and other social sciences.  This course examines anthropological and social science contributions to understandings of development and underdevelopment and addresses the different theories, critiques, and "schools" of development studies; ethnographic research on selected themes of development; and the institutional actors that shape the discourses, policies, and activities of development.  The course is intended to cover both the theoretical and policy aspects of development anthropology and to challenge students to think critically about development problems and the narratives that inform policy and development processes.  By focusing on both critiques and development policies, it attempts to provide a somewhat balanced picture of a field that often is characterized by moral polemics and a great deal of miscommunication and stereotyping.

The course recognizes that the literature on development and change is voluminous and increasing as quickly as any field in the social sciences.  For this reason, it is not possible, nor desirable to cover all the relevant areas of development studies.  Instead, the course has opted for a select number of topics, such as markets, policy reform, and states, that highlight innovative research and approaches to development, as well as areas where anthropological contributions are especially prominent.  The course will emphasize ethnographies of different aspects of development, with the majority of them authored by anthropologists.  It is designed as an advanced graduate seminar and requires that students actively participate in class and come to class prepared to discuss the week¿s readings.

***

ANT 585-004 [5277]: Special Topics: Unarchived Histories

Crosslisted as HIST 585-004/MESAS 570-000

Gyanendra Pandey

Tu 1:00-4:00

***

ANT 585-00P [6312]: Feminist and Queer Ethnographies

Crosslisted as WGS 587

Melissa Hackman

Mon 10:00-1:00

Contact Marybeth Smith at msmith80@emory.edu to enroll.

In Feminist and Queer Ethnographies we will address how feminist and queer theories, activism, and politics affect and alter ethnographic projects, methods, and writing. We will read contemporary ethnographies that address questions of representation, affect, intersectionality, positionality, globalization, desires, and community. We will put feminist and queer theories in conversation with each other to see where and why they converge and digress and how that impacts the ways that the anthropological project plays out. We will be interested in the contemporary state of both subfields and the key questions, debates, and theoretical and methodological innovations and disagreements that have emerged over time. We will address what makes a project feminist and/or queer and how and when theorists choose (or not) to link their work to larger political discourses and practices. We will engage the key theorists, terms, and histories that emerge in queer and feminist writings, as well as what genealogies authors situate themselves in.

ANT 797R: Directed Study

***

ANT 798R: Advanced Research

***

ANT 799R: Dissertation Research

Fall 2016

ANT 500-000 [1455]  Proseminar in Anthropology

Chikako Ozawa-de Silva
TU 10:00-1:00

Anthropology 500 provides a graduate introduction to the field of Anthropology, especially as practiced here at Emory University.  We begin with a brief introduction to some of the debates and issues surrounding the analytical scope, theories, and methods of the field of Anthropology. The bulk of the semester will be spent exploring how these wide ranging approaches to Anthropology, epistemology, methodology, theory, and inter-disciplinarity are reflected, translated, and applied in Anthropological research. These engagements with Anthropological scholarship will be enacted in several forms: (1) a pro-seminar, in which various faculty members of the Emory Anthropology Department visit the class to present and discuss their `sub-field¿ of anthropology and their own scholarly research; (2) weekly précis papers summarizing a selected text from the assigned readings; (3) individual research projects (annotated bibliographies as well as a more integrative `review essay¿) engaging a range of theories and methodological approaches within their chosen area of scholarship.  Students are also strongly encouraged to attend scholarly presentations sponsored within the department as well as related campus talks, seminars and workshops as they arise over the course of the semester. In sum, the course engages new members of the field in ongoing conversations and debates about the big questions, competing perspectives, and telling insights of anthropology.

Particulars: Only students registered in the Anthropology PhD program may enroll. All enrollments are processed through Anthropology.

¿¿¿

ANT 501-000 [1456]  History of Anthropological Thought

Robert Paul
TH 9:00-12:00

This course traces some of the main trends in the history of theory in socio-cultural anthropology since the field¿s origins in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.  It begins with a consideration of the Victorian-era thinkers such as Tylor, Morgan, Spencer, and Frazer, and then continues with a discussion of Boas and Durkheim, the two great modernizers of the field.  Durkheim¿s influence in France continues through Mauss, Levi-Strauss, and Bourdieu; and in England through Malinowski and Radcliffe-Brown to Evans-Pritchard, Victor Turner, and Mary Douglas; while in America several different schools branch out from under the influence of Boas and his immediate successors such as Kroeber and Lowie: first there are Benedict and Mead, whose influence leads to latter day symbolic  anthropology as represented by Geertz, Schneider and others; then there is the important school of cultural materialism and evolution leading from Leslie White and Julian Steward to Marvin Harris, Roy Rappaport, and others; the impact of feminist theory of anthropology represented by figures such as Sherry Ortner, Michelle Rosaldo, and others; and finally the post-modern turn, represented by James Clifford, George Marcus, and Michael Fischer.

¿¿¿

ANT 555R-00P [4824]  Research Seminar in Biological Anthropology

Craig Hadley
TH 4:30-5:30

Required for First-year through Third-year Biological Anthropology Students

¿¿¿

ANT 560-000 [4825]  Methods in Cultural Anthropology

Bruce Knauft
W 6:00-9:00

This course explores methods of ethnographic fieldwork, proposal writing, and ethnographic write-up and representation in cultural anthropology.  The course is designed for first and second year graduate students in cultural anthropology who intend to conduct long-term ethnographic doctoral research in a field setting.  The course construes ¿methods¿ as the professional skills associated with practically conducting and completing doctoral fieldwork, on the one hand, and issues of writing and representation before, during, and following fieldwork, on the other.  This includes techniques and methods used to collect information in the field as well as the configuration and analysis of information for purposes of proposal writing, write-up, and various forms of media representation.  The course considers pilot studies, proposal writing, full fieldwork, and subsequent write-up as stages of professional development that are integrally linked and yet in important ways disjoined or disjunctive in our lived experience as researchers.

The course draws heavily on the specific research agendas and field plans of the individual students taking the course.  Classes are structured in a seminar format that privileges engaged discussion, student presentation, and instructor analysis and commentary on student projects, both individually and collectively.  Reading includes highly selected classic and recent works concerning ethnographic methods, fieldwork experience, and ethnographic writing as well as successful field work funding proposals written in previous years by students and faculty.  Major attention is given to student proposal writing.  The course is not designed as a survey or literature review of available works concerrning field methods or ethnography.  The larger goal is rather to critically cultivate strategies whereby students can successfully implement and carry out their own doctoral field research projects.      

Students interested in taking this course should feel free to contact the instructor in advance concerning their research interests, including how these may be engaged with the course materials and structure.

The course is designed primarily for anthropology graduate students.  Students not intending to conduct long term ethnographic fieldwork as part of their doctoral research should definitely contact the instructor before attempting to enroll. 

Readings:
Emerson, Robert M., Rachel I Fretz, and Linda L. Shaw, Writing Ethnographic Fieldnotes, 2nd edition. University of Chicago Press.  ISBN:  978-0-226-20683-7.
Van Maanen, John, Tales of the Field:  On Writing Ethnography, 2nd edition. University of Chicago Press.  ISBN: 978-0-226-84964-5.
Skinner, Jonathan, Editor.  The Interview: An Ethnographic Approach.  New York: Berg.  ISBN: 978-1-84788-939-3.
Gardner, Andrew and David M. Hoffman.  Dispatches from the Field:  Neophyte Ethnographers in a Changing World. Long Grove, IL:  Waveland. ISBN: 978-1-57766-451-2. 

¿¿¿

ANT 585-000 [1457]  Evolutionary Modeling

Paul Hooper
MW 10:00-11:15

¿¿¿

ANT 585-003 [1460]  Voice and Visibility

Debra Vidali
TH 1:00-4:00

The aim of this seminar is to develop a theoretical framework and practical toolkit for understanding issues of voice and visibility as they affect the human condition and modes of expression.  We will examine how voice and visibility -- and their negative counterparts, silence, invisibility, and erasure ¿ frame the politics of representation in contemporary struggles of self-determination.  We will also examine these themes as they impact the projects of knowledge production across the social sciences and humanities.  Questions of who gets to speak, who is heard, and which types of voices and even genres count as legitimate are central in the politics of recognition, sovereignty, human rights, civil society, and social reproduction.  In many cases, the politicized activation of `voice¿ occurs against a history of silencing, erasure, invisibility, (stereo)typification, and even ventriloquism.  
 
Diverse approaches will be engaged, including: postcolonial theory, critical race theory, feminist theory, queer theory, sociolinguistics, visual anthropology, performance studies, media studies, discourse analysis, and transgressive writing.  Readings will examine topics such as:  indigenous rights, sovereignty, citizenship, sexuality, embodiment, racial passing, and the Black Lives Matter movement.  Course readings will be selected based on participants¿ interests and training needs.  

Current books under consideration include:

The Dialogic Imagination,by M. M. Bakhtin
Bad Indians, by Deborah Miranda (2013)
Red Skin, White Masks: Rejecting the Colonial Politics of Recognition, by Glen Sean Coulthard (2014)
Museums, Heritage and Indigenous Voice: Decolonizing Engagement, by Byroni Onciul (2015)
Between the World and Me, by Ta-Nahesi Coates (2015)
Talk to Me:  Listening Between the Lines, by Anna Deavere-Smith (2001)
Clearly Invisible: Racial Passing and the Color of Cultural Identity, by Marcia A Dawkins (2012).
Out in the Country: Youth, Media, and Queer Visibility in Rural America, by Mary L. Gray (2009)
The Sixth Sense Reader, ed. David Howes (2009)
Civic Engagements: The Citizenship Practices of Indian and Vietnamese Immigrants, by Caroline Brettell and Deborah Reed-Danahay (2015)
Voicing Subjects: Public Intimacy and Mediation in Kathmandu, by Laura Kunreuther (2014)
Missing Bodies:  The Politics of Visibility, by Monica J. Casper and Lisa Jean Moore (2009)
Can the Subaltern Speak?: Reflections on the History of an Idea, ed. by Rosalind Morris (2010)

¿¿¿

ANT 585-004 [2454]  From Landmarks to Revisions

Thomas Rogers & Jeffrey Lesser
TH 9:00-12:00
Cross-listed with HIST

¿¿¿

ANT 585-005 [3374]  Experiments in Scholarly Form

Angelika Bammer & Anna Grimshaw
TU 1:00-4:00
Cross-listed with COMP LIT

Recent developments in American higher education¿the increasing emphasis on inter- disciplinarity, the so-called ¿crisis¿ of academic publishing, the call for more attention to public scholarship, and the emergence of new fields of scholarly inquiry¿have put pressure on the traditional forms through which scholarship is presented. While such pressure is sometimes experienced negatively, as a problem, it also presents a productive occasion for innovation and creativity.

Often interdisciplinarity is conceptualized as an additive model: philosophy plus literature, anthropology plus history, X plus Y. This course starts from a different premise. We take genuine interdisciplinarity to be an open-ended, exploratory process that by its very nature cannot be encompassed within the existing framework of conventional academic disciplines. Not only are new disciplines and fields of study continually emerging, but established disciplines are themselves in an ongoing process of revision and reinvention, both internally and in dialogue with other disciplines. In this environment, exploration and experimentation are integral to scholarly work. In this spirit of discovery and exploration, our course explores challenges to established forms of scholarly representation. Drawing on a series of case studies, we examine ways of pursuing intellectual inquiry that extend beyond the conventional academic text. In particular, we consider experiments in a variety of media: writing (e.g. personal memoir, dialogue, the essay, diary), image-based (the photo-essay and film) and digital forms.

The goal of this course is twofold: (1) Students will learn to critically assess the possibilities and limitations of conventional forms of scholarly presentation in their fields; (2) They will learn to explore new forms of scholarly presentation relevant to their work.

Materials include: Berger, J and Mohr, J. A Seventh Man (1975); Steedman, C. Landscape for a Good Woman (1986); MacDougall, D. To Live With Herds (1971); Stewart, K. Ordinary Affects (2007)

¿¿¿

ANT 585-006 [5909]  Ethnography of Religious Experience

Don Seeman
W 12:00-3:00
Cross-listed with REL

This seminar is a critical introduction to theory and methodology in the ethnography/anthropology of religion. We will read full-length ethnographies that focus on a variety of religious settings¿Christian, Muslim, Buddhist, Jewish¿ as well as some classics in religious studies, such as William James. How does ethnography ask and answer questions differently than other methodologies in religious studies? What are its strengths and limitations? And how do recent trends in the anthropology of religious experience/phenomenological anthropology promise to transform both anthropology and the study of religion as academic disciplines? This course will also be of special interest to students of religion in Africa, the Middle East and the United States. Both advanced and beginner students in the anthropology of religion welcome!

¿¿¿

ANT 797R              Directed Study

¿¿¿

ANT 798R              Advanced Research

¿¿¿

ANT 799R              Dissertation Research

Spring 2016

ANT 503-000 [2117]  Evolutionary Processes

Dietrich Stout
MW 1:00-2:15

This course aims to situate the study of human adaptation and evolution within the broader theoretical framework of evolutionary biology. We will cover core issues including genetics, phylogenetics, natural selection, sexual selection, behavioral ecology, life history evolution, the evolution of development, and gene-culture coevolution using examples drawn from both ancient and recent human evolution.

¿¿¿

ANT 510-000 [2119]  Medical Anthropology

Chikako Ozawa-de Silva
W 10:00-1:00

This course is designed as an introduction to medical anthropology. The course is organized thematically and examines some of the important issues in contemporary medical anthropology, including: Illness, disease and sickness; illness as metaphor of socio-cultural distress; the process of medicalization; current paradigm shift in biomedicine; culture-bound syndromes; ¿naturalizing¿ processes; contestation for medical legitimacy in plural societies; non-western medical systems; body and mind in illness and healing; cross-cultural psychiatric anthropology; infectious disease and inequality; power/knowledge and medical practices; and ambiguity in death and dying in the era of high technology. This course will explore the role of medicine in our society, how anthropological analysis can be applicable in understanding the complexity of human conditions such as health, illness and sickness, physical and mental pain, suffering, death and dying.

Texts (Required and Suggested):
Anne Fadiman, The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down
Peter J. Brown, Understanding and Applying Medical Anthropology
Arthur Kleinman, Illness Narratives
Margaret Lock, Twice Dead: Organ Transplants and the Reinvention of Death
Susan Sontag, Illness as metaphor and AIDS and its Metaphors
Daniel Moerman, Meaning, Medicine and the ¿Placebo Effect¿
Michel Foucault, The Birth of the Clinic
Nancy Scheper-Hughes, Death Without Weeping
Daniel Goleman, Destructive Emotions
Chikako Ozawa-de Silva, Psychotherapy and Religion in Japan
Carolyn F. Sargent and Thomas M. Johnson, Medical Anthropology
Byron Good, Medicine, Rationality, and Experience
Paul Farmer, Infections and Inequality
Tanya Luhrmann, Of Two Minds
Others.

Particulars:
Requirements include class presentations, weekly response papers, a mid-term paper, and a final paper.

¿¿¿

ANT 555R-000 [2120]  Research Seminar in Biological Anthropology

Paul Hooper
TH 4:50-5:30

Required for First-year through Third-year Biological Anthropology Students

¿¿¿

ANT 585-000 [3555]  Heritage & Power

Jenny Chio
TU 6:00-9:00

In the wake of recent clashes between China and Japan over the inclusion of documents about the Nanjing Massacre into UNESCO¿s ¿International Memory of the World¿ register and of news from Syria on the destruction of monuments in Palmyra by ISIS militants, there is a renewed urgency to reconceptualize heritage, its politics, and its power. After all, UNESCO World Heritage designation and similar domestic categories remain vital for global tourism industries, local entrepreneurs, and nationalist sentiments. This seminar will approach heritage and the intersecting vectors of power and authority that renders heritage so desirable and dangerous by addressing three categories: land, things, and bodies. Land and landscapes constitute one of the most fundamental sites of political authority based on notions of cultural belonging and historical presence. Things, from materials to monuments, are often the most recognizable objects of cultural heritage, and thus the first to be destroyed, removed, stolen, and sold. Bodies, in both the sense of the embodiment of cultural knowledge and the physiological, frequently racialized body, play a central role in the formation and politicization of collective memory and the denial of minority and marginalized experiences. The aim of this seminar is to build a critical language and theoretical framework for understanding the power of heritage in contemporary global politics and the history of the idea of heritage itself, with a particular focus how discourses of racialized, ethnic, and sociocultural differences elide with what is nowadays referred to as ¿heritage.¿ Readings will explore the politics of recognition, discourses of multiculturalism, war and heritage sites, the materiality of memory and historical trauma, as well as Indigenous biopolitics.

Required Books (subject to change):
Lowenthal, David. 2015.
The Past is a Foreign Country ¿ Revisited. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press (2nd Edition).
Mitchell, WJT, eds. 2002.
Landscape and Power. Chicago: University of Chicago Press (2nd Edition).
Nelson, Robert S. and Margaret Olin. 2004.
Monuments and Memory, Made and Unmade. Chicago:University of Chicago Press.
Povinelli, Elizabeth. 2002.
The Cunning of Recognition: Indigenous Alterities and Australian Multiculturalism. Durham: Duke University Press.
Ricoer, Paul. 2006.
Memory, History, Forgetting. Chicago: University of Chicago Press (Paperback edition).
Sion, Brigitte. 2014.
Death Tourism: Disaster Sites as Recreational Landscapes. Seagull Press.
Stoler, Ann, ed. 2013.
Imperial Debris: On Ruins and Ruination. Durham: Duke University Press.
TallBear, Kim. 2013.
Native American DNA: Tribal Belonging and the False Promise of Genetic Science. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.

Recommended Books (subject to change):
Halbwachs, Maurice. 1992.
On Collective Memory. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
Schama, Simon. 1996.
Landscape and Memory. Vintage Books.
Smith, Laurajane. 2006.
Uses of Heritage. London: Routledge.

¿¿¿

ANT 585-001 [3556]  Theory & Ethnography in the New Millennium

Michael Peletz
MW 2:30-3:45

This course examines trends in ethnography and socio-cultural theory since the turn of the new millennium. We will focus both on the new directions that anthropologists are endeavoring to map out as well as the (obvious and not so obvious) continuities with respect to the theory and practice of fieldwork and the anthropological enterprise more generally since the latter part of the 20th century.

One of our points of departure will be the two-fold argument that, for a variety of reasons having to do mostly with the nature of the current world order, ¿fieldwork is not what it used to be¿; and that new modes of engagement with our interlocutors in the (variously defined) ¿field¿ are therefore both necessary and desirable. Course readings will focus on book-length ethnographies that, taken collectively, demonstrate an important range of contemporary engagements with themes addressed by foundational theorists such as Weber, Gramsci, Foucault, and Bourdieu. Topics to be explored include different understandings of ¿engaged anthropology¿; different approaches to understanding and writing about the ways in which variably gendered and sexed subjects are embodied; and the contributions that anthropology can make to our understanding of contemporary societies and cultures in relation to processes of modernity and neoliberal globalization. More generally, one of the objectives of the course is to help students develop an understanding of anthropology¿s relevance in the new millennium.

Course Requirements and Evaluations: The success of this seminar depends on the commitments and contributions of all its members. Twenty to twenty-five percent of your grade will be based on the quality of your class participation. The remainder of your grade will be based on your written work, which will consist of periodic ¿response papers¿ (2-3 pgs. each; once every few weeks) and a (15-18 page) term paper, which may focus on assigned readings or on other subjects of interest to you.

¿¿¿

ANT 585-002 [3557]  Anthropological Approaches to Population Issues

Craig Hadley
TTH 2:30-3:45

Anthropology is, in many ways, the study of populations: how they are defined; how they increase, decrease, and distribute themselves across landscapes; why they move, settle down; and how they interact with and differentiate themselves from other populations. The study of populations also invites us to examine the costs and benefits of living with others, to explore how resources are distributed within and between populations, and to analyze the causes and consequences of differing group configurations and compositions. In this seminar-style course we take population as our central theme and study how anthropologists have approached the issues noted above, as well as others such as conflict, cooperation, and culture. Our usual approach will be to read a classic theory paper(s) and then look to see how people have confronted these theoretical ideas with data and how that, in turn, might advance anthropological theory. Our aim as a community of scholars will be to survey the field; to identify key research questions and hypotheses; to identify how theory and data smash up against one another; and to focus on the evidence that has been brought forth to support claims.  Our focus will be neither exclusively biological nor cultural, but we will focus exclusively on research that has taken a systematic, scientific approach to answer population-related questions.

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ANT 585-003 [6590]  Global Mental Health: Anthropological Perspectives (1 credit)

Peter Brown
TU 4:00-5:15

The past decade has seen rapid growth in research, intervention, and funding for global mental health. Leading researchers and practitioners have demanded that national and international political leaders provide commensurate financial and human resources in order to make an impact on mental health problems in resource-constrained settings. Such advocacy efforts have produced clear results as measured by the emergence of scholarship, pilot programs, and policies dedicated to elevating mental health care.  Recent measures of the global burden of diverse health problems have shown that poor mental health is a major cause of disability in many different societies.

Emory alumni have made significant contributions to the field of global mental health, both inside and outside of academia. The edited volume Global Mental Health: Anthropological Perspectives, Edited by alumni Brandon Kohrt (MD, PhD) and Emily Mendenhall (PhD, MPH) published by Left Coast Press in 2015, is a product of such Emory-connected collaboration.  The volume, which includes 10 alumni authors, considers the topics of social determinants of mental illness, treatment approaches, and alternative care models; it emphasizes current avenues of engagement in each of these areas.

Participants in the course will discuss the chapters of that volume as well as selections of books like Crazy Like Us (E, Watters, 2011), World Mental Health (D Desjarlais et al, 1994), Where There Is No Psychiatrist (V. Patel, 2003) Global Mental Health: Principles and Practice (V. Patel et al, 2013) as well as journal articles.  We will invite a number of Emory researchers interested in the topic to join some class sessions.  Most reading selections and reading topics will be chosen by the seminar members themselves.  There are no writing assignments, final course grades are based solely on prepared participation. 

The culmination of the course will be participation in the Emory Global Mental Health symposium on April 29-30, 2016.  Attendance at the symposium is mandatory; a key question for the symposium will be: how can we more systematically and effectively incorporate anthropological theory and methods into global mental health and health systems research? Many of the authors of the Global Mental Health volume will be coming to the symposium.

Students from all parts of the University, including RSPH and advanced undergraduate students, are welcome to enroll.  Interest in the subject, rather than background in Anthropology, is most important.

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ANT 797R              Directed Study

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ANT 798R              Advanced Research

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ANT 799R              Dissertation Research

Fall 2015

ANT 500-00P [4454]  Proseminar in Anthropology

Carol Worthman
M 9:00-12:00

ANT 500 provides a graduate survey of the field of Anthropology, especially as practiced here at Emory University.  We begin with a brief introduction to some of the debates and issues surrounding the analytical scope, theories, and methods of the field of Anthropology. The bulk of the semester will be spent exploring how these wide ranging approaches to Anthropology, epistemology, methodology, theory, and inter-disciplinarity are reflected, translated, and applied in Anthropological research. These engagements with Anthropological scholarship will be enacted in several forms: (1) a pro-seminar, in which various faculty members of the Emory Anthropology Department visit the class to present and discuss their `sub-field¿ of anthropology and their own scholarly research; (2) weekly précis papers summarizing a selected text from the assigned readings; (3) individual research projects (annotated bibliographies as well as a more integrative `review essay¿) engaging a range of theories and methodological approaches within their chosen area of scholarship.  Students are also strongly encouraged to attend scholarly presentations sponsored within the department as well as related campus talks, seminars and workshops as they arise over the course of the semester.

Readings: TBA

Particulars: Only students registered in the Anthropology PhD program may enroll. All enrollments are processed through Anthropology.

ANT 501-00P [4455]  History of Anthropological Thought

Robert Paul
TU 9:00-12:00

This course traces some of the main trends in the history of theory in socio-cultural anthropology since the field¿s origins in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.  It begins with a consideration of the Victorian-era thinkers such as Tylor, Morgan, Spencer, and Frazer, and then continues with a discussion of Boas and Durkheim, the two great modernizers of the field.  Durkheim¿s influence in France continues through Mauss, Levi-Strauss, and Bourdieu; and in England through Malinowski and Radcliffe-Brown to Evans-Pritchard, Victor Turner, and Mary Douglas; while in America several different schools branch out from under the influence of Boas and his immediate successors such as Kroeber and Lowie: first there are Benedict and Mead, whose influence leads to latter day symbolic  anthropology as represented by Geertz, Schneider and others; then there is the important school of cultural materialism and evolution leading from Leslie White and Julian Steward to Marvin Harris, Roy Rappaport, and others; the impact of feminist theory of anthropology represented by figures such as Sherry Ortner, Michelle Rosaldo, and others; and finally the post-modern turn, represented by James Clifford, George Marcus, and Michael Fischer.

ANT 555R-000 [4456]  Research Seminar in Biological Anthropology

Jim Rilling
TH 4:30-5:30

Required for First-year through Third-year Biological Anthropology Students

ANT 585-000 [2539]  New Paradigms/Old Trends

Thomas Rogers
W 1:00-4:00
Cross-listed with HIST

Difficult as it is to cover the 500-year sweep of Latin American History in thirteen three-hour seminars, this graduate course demands that Latin Americanists conduct such selective coverage. ¿Themes and Approaches in Latin American History¿ embraces the impossibility of the task through critical and explicit engagement with methods of research, pedagogy, and narrative. Students will work with conventional geographic and chronological frameworks for understanding and teaching Latin American history. At the same time, students will challenge orthodox paradigms by evaluating new scholarship and questioning dominant conceptions of periodization, methodology, and discipline. Articles on historiography, theory, and teaching will supplement national/local case studies and canonical texts.

Over the course of the semester, students will gain familiarity with what are considered to be the major chronological moments and formative events in the region, while fleshing out interdisciplinary approaches, perspectives, methods, and linkages. Analytical concerns revolve around the relationship between methodology and empirical conclusions, and how scholars¿ shifting intellectual and political agendas have led them to integrate different disciplinary approaches into the study of history.

ANT 585-001 [2549]  Subaltern Studies: Past, Present, and Future

Gyanendra Pandey
TH 1:00-4:00
Cross-listed with HIST, ILA, WGS

What is Subaltern Studies? A history of the poor and the marginalized in the colonized world? A supplement to standard histories of state and society? A new archive for people without history, and without written records of their own? Or a challenge to the disciplines of anthropology, history, sociology, religious studies, etc, as we know them?

The first volumes of the Indian Subaltern Studies initiative, launched by a group of graduate students and teachers in the early 1980s, were regarded as another instance of `history from below¿, with the difference that the method was now being applied to a `Third World¿ country by its own scholars. Later Subaltern Studies have been seen as a prominent example of postcolonial writing, and accused of having succumbed to Western theory in a way that reduces the original concern with the `subaltern¿.

What were the political and historiographical debates out of which these writings emerged, and what are the debates they have in turn generated? What accounts for the alleged move from a critique of nationalism and the state, to a critique of history? How have scholars of South and North America, Africa and other parts of the world responded to the idea of `Subaltern Studies¿, and to questions regarding the portability of theory ¿ or its applicability across cultures and continents?

The purpose of this course is to think through some of these questions in the light of our different disciplines and individual research agendas.

ANT 585-002 [2556]  Passing in America

Jonathan Prude
TU 4:15-7:15
Cross-listed with HIST

What does it mean for people to transform themselves in a society devoted to self-improvement, on the one hand, and continuing authenticity, on the other? To reinvention and yet also to sincerity? When is acquiring a new identity permissible and commendable? When is it dangerous and subversive? Who decides? Under the broad flag of ¿Passing,¿ this seminar will explore such questions as they unfolded across American history from colonial times to the present and amidst transitions across boundaries of class, race, ethnicity, and gender. Materials for the course will include primary and secondary sources, fiction and non-fiction, texts, images, and film.

Required Textbooks, Articles, and Resources:
1. B. Franklin, Autobiography
2. Neil Harris, Humbug
3. H. Melville, The Confidence Man
4. K. Haltunnen, Confidence Men and Painted Women
5. H. Alger, Jr. Ragged Dick
6. Dale Cockrell, Demons of Disorder: Early Blackface Minstrels and Their World
7. Phelps, Silent Partner
8. N. Enstad, Ladies of Labor
9. Chauncy, Gay New York
10. N. Larsen, Passing
11. The Jazz Singer (movie)
12. B. Schulberg, What Makes Sammy Run?
13. Paris is Burning (movie)
14. B. Ehrenreich, Nickel and Dimed

Grading:
Assessments will be based on robust and thoughtful participation in weekly class sessions and on two written assignments (approximately ten pages each).

CANCELLED ¿ ANT 585S-000 [4457]  Image Work: Visual Techniques in Qualitative Research

Anna Grimshaw
M 1:00-4:00
Cross-listed with HIST, SOC

ANT 585S-001 [4458]  Anthropology of Global Health

Peter Brown
M 2:30-3:45/W 2:00-3:50

Once a week, this course meets together with a two-credit Rollins School of Public Health class entitled ¿Anthropological Perspectives on Global Health¿ (GH 557).   It is a combination of discussion and some lecture on the biocultural and cultural analysis to five global health areas: infectious disease; nutrition (under nutrition and obesity); reproductive health; and community health; and global health policy.  The focus is on low and middle income countries and a major theme goal is for PH students to understand that every global health intervention entails a cross-cultural interaction.  The lesson, therefore, is that successful PH practitioners must be reflexively cognizant of their own culture.  Most readings for this part of the course are article-length ethnographic case studies.  Student valuation is based upon biweekly homework exercises, a book review and two essay tests.  In Fall 2015 this part of the course will be 2:00-3:50 on Wednesdays.  RSPH students in the class usually come from all departments of the school; Anthropology graduate students will benefit from interactions with MPH students who have a more applied orientation.

The second part of the course is a culturally-oriented seminar in Medical Anthropology that focuses on the cultural history of global public health and ethnographic monographs of public health programs or problems.  At the beginning of the semester, students in this part of the course help select possible books based on their particular interests.  Students help lead class discussions.  Some selected books or dissertations usually chosen have been written by Emory Anthropology alumni.  Generally, this part of the course does not emphasize biocultural approaches or studies of Biomedicine.  Topics usually include: cultural history of colonial medicine and international health; population programs; disease-specific programs (polio, malaria); women¿s health; complex humanitarian emergencies. However, readings are not geographically limited because the field of global health also includes high income countries.  Evaluation of students is based on class participation (including some reaction postings), and a relatively short individualized writing project.  Depending on student schedules, the seminar is scheduled to meet Mondays 2:30-3:45. 

ANT 585S-002 [4459]  The Anthropological Study of Ritual

Bradd Shore
TU 2:00-5:00
Cross-listed with RLTS

DESCRIPTION: This course is a study of ritual and related performance frames from an anthropological perspective.  We begin with fundamental questions about the evolutionary origins of ritual and ritualization for humans, and then attempt to address the questions of the nature of ritual and why it has persisted in human life despite the evolution of language. Using a number of detailed case studies from both religious and secular ritual forms, we will study the diverse forms and functions of ritual, and explanations of ritual from both scientific and indigenous perspectives. Finally we will look at a variety of other performance frames such as play, games and theater, asking how they are related to ritual. 

BOOKS:

1. Grimes, Ronald L. (ed.) Readings in Ritual Studies. Ronald L. Grimes. Pearson, 1995. ISBN-13: 978-0023472534  ISBN-10: 0023472537

2. Buford, Bill, Among the Thugs. New York: Vintage, 1993 ISBN-13: 978-0679745358  ISBN-10: 0679745351 

3. Rappaport, Roy A. Ritual and Religion in the Making of Humanity. Cambridge, U.K.; New York: Cambridge University Press, 1999. ISBN-10: 0521296900, ISBN-13: 978-0521296908

4. Kertzer, David, Ritual, Politics, and Power, New Haven: Yale University Press, 1988 ISBN-10: 0300040075, ISBN-13: 978-0300040074

5. Van Gennep, Arnold, Rites of Passage, Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1961, ISBN-13: 000-0226848493  ISBN-10: 0226848493

6. Bell, Catherine, Ritual Theory, Ritual Practice. New York: Oxford University  Press, 2009. ISBN-13: 978-0199735105  ISBN-10: 0199735107 

7. Tinbergen, Niko, The Herring Gull's World: A Study of the Social Behaviour of Birds (The New Naturalist) Paperback, 1989 SBN-10: 1558210490/ISBN-13: 978-1558210493

8. Garvey, Catherine Play (Enlarged Edition). Cambridge: Harvard University Press , 1990. ISBN-10: 0674673654/ISBN-13: 978-0674673656

9. Walens, Stanley Feasting With Cannibals: An Essay on Kwakiutl    Cosmology  Princeton Legacy Library) Paperback, 2014. ISBN-10: 069161461X/ISBN-13: 978-0691614618

10. Goffman, Erving Interaction Ritual, New York, Anchor Books, 1967 ISBN-10: 0394706315, ISBN-13: 978-0394706313

11. Apffel-Marglin, Frederique, Subversive Spiritualities: How Rituals Enact the World, New York: Oxford University Press, 2012.  ISBN-10: 0199793867/ISBN-13: 978-0199793860

12. Caroline Humphrey and James Laidlaw, The Archetypal Actions of Ritual A Theory of Ritual Illustrated by the Jain Rite of Worship

ANT 585S-003 [4460]  Evolutionary Modeling

Paul Hooper
W 4:00-7:00

This course will provide an introduction to building and understanding mathematical and computational models based on principles of evolutionary biology. The course will introduce a number of modeling frameworks utilized in evolutionary and behavioral ecology, including static and dynamic optimization, evolutionary game theory, life history theory, optimal allocation/investment problems, dual-inheritance theory (i.e. cultural evolution), multi-level selection, numerical methods and simulations, and agent-based models. A variety of topic areas will be addressed, including the evolution of life histories, altruism and cooperation, foraging behavior, individual and social learning, time allocation, mating behavior, costly/honest signaling, social networks, and demographic processes. An emphasis will be placed on representing (a) the effects of exogenous aspects of environment and socioecology, (b) endogenous behavioral processes, and (c) consequent long-run behavioral outcomes. It will be stressed that the ultimate utility of abstract models depends on their ability to generate novel insight, and/or yield concrete predictions that can be tested using real-world empirical data. The trade-offs in model building between generality and specificity, and between simplicity and realism will also be discussed.

The intended consumers of the course are graduate students in anthropology, biology, or other social or life sciences seeking to leverage evolutionary theory in their research. Students should come with a foundation in basic mathematics, and should be willing to learn new skills and techniques. The computational and numerical aspects of the course will employ the NetLogo and R software packages. Student commitments will include readings, homework assignments, a modeling project, and in-class participation.

ANT 585S-004 [4461]  Evolution of Human Subsistence

Jessica Thompson
F 11:00-2:00

Semester Description: Human nutrition and subsistence behavior from an evolutionary perspective. Methods for reconstructing past diets and addressing key origins questions in our lineage. Discussions of the impacts of significant changes in human subsistence over the last 6 million years. Seminar format with final research project.
 
Semester Details: This course examines human nutrition and subsistence behavior from an evolutionary perspective. It begins with human nutritional literature and discussions of our biological requirements, then moves into comparison of modern human dietary ecology with those of other primates, especially our closest living relatives, the great apes. We then turn to literature that demonstrates the methods and theoretical approaches that are currently used to reconstruct past diets. As we begin to follow the evidence for changes in subsistence in the hominin lineage, case studies using these methods will be integrated into discussions of how we know what we do about past nutrition. The course will spend time on key issues and debates such as changes from closed-habitat to open-habitat foraging, the origins of meat-eating, the role of extractive foraging in human social systems, variation in hunter-forager subsistence systems, the origins of domestication, and the phenomenon of fad diets in industrialized nations. The course will be delivered in a seminar-style format, with key readings each week that follow topical themes, with assessment based on in-class participation, critical essays, and a final research project.
 
Textbook: None.

ANT 797R              Directed Study

ANT 798R              Advanced Research

ANT 799R              Dissertation Research