Upcoming Events

January 22
Marcela Benítez
Cooperation, Conflict, and the Mechanism of Social Decission-making in Nonhuman Primates
1PM, ANT 206

Dr. Benítez's research program examines how nonhuman primates make decisions in their social world, what factors impact these choices, and ultimately why these decisions are adaptive. She approaches these questions from an evolutionary perspective while utilizing a mechanistic approach, through the integration of experimental paradigms in the wild, and the analysis and manipulation of hormone profiles. In this talk, she focuses on decision-making during cooperation and conflict, two situations in which making the wrong choice can have significant fitness consequences. First, she examines how wild gelada males make the most informed decisions during conflict. Second, she discusses how conflict influences cooperative decisions (i.e., parochial altruism) in capuchin monkeys, and the role of hormones in promoting cooperation during conflict. Third, she discusses her future goals to examine the evolutionary roots and biological underpinnings of parochial altruism, comparing decision-making during conflict across the primate taxa in both captivity and in wild. By combining the best aspects of naturalistic field work, highlighting the emergence of social challenges, and the best aspects of tightly controlled experiments, highlighting the mechanisms of social choices, here research offers a promising avenue for understanding the importance of sociality, cooperation, and conflict on primate cognitive evolution.

Dr. Marcela E. Benítez (PhD Univ. of Michigan) is Postdoctoral Fellow at Georgia State Univ. She is also the co-director of the Capuchins de Taboga Field Station, a long-term research project studying the cognition and behavior of wild white-faced capuchins in the Taboga forest reserve of Costa Rica. 

January 23
A Lunch Discussion: Ecologies of Care and Repair. Anthropocenic Perspectives on Development
Moderated by Anthony Dest, Peter Habib, Katharine Kindquist, Shreyas Sreenath
Light lunch will be provided
12:15 - 1:15pm, ANT 110

January 27
Angela Garcia
Social Disparities in Health: what drives variation in disease risk between and within populations?
1PM, ANT 206

Dr. Garcia uses a life history framework and a multilevel systems biology approach to explore how psychosocial and environmental factors (e.g. perceptions of stress, inequality, pathogen exposure) interact with physiological (e.g. hormones and immune) and genomic (transcriptomic and genetic) processes, to determine patterns of health and disease within and between populations. Much of her recent work was conducted in a new field site she developed in Honduras, working with immigrant women facing both high levels of discrimination and poor health outcomes. This research focuses on the pathways through which psychosocial stressors like discrimination relate to metabolic risk via influences on neuroendocrine-immune regulatory interactions. Her current and future research aims at disentangling the influences of social and ecological stress on neuroendocrine-immune signaling to understand the rise of cardiometabolic disease in Latino populations and the emergence of intergenerational cycles of health disparity.

Dr. Angela Garcia is a postdoctoral research fellow at the Center of Evolution and Medicine at Arizona State University. Her work is situated at the intersection of human biology, evolutionary medicine, and anthropology, and investigates how social disparities impact endocrine and immune physiology, and the adverse impact this has on health. Her research program combines fieldwork, bench-based laboratory research, and state-of-the-art statistical analysis on diverse types of data, including individual and household-level interviews, hormonal and immune biomarkers, and genomic data.

January 30
Experimental Ethnography Showcase
Open Gallery 4:00 - 8:00pm
Presentations by Exibitors 6:00pm
ANT 206

 

February 3
Calen Ryan
Tradeoffs between reproduction and aging in the human epigenome
1PM, ANT 206

Why do we age, and why do some individuals appear to ‘age’ more rapidly than others? Evolutionary theory leads to the prediction that energy allocated to one function, such as reproduction, should come at the expense of bodily maintenance, accelerating biological aging. Such ‘costs of reproduction’ are supported by experimental work in non-human animals and epidemiological data in human populations – especially among women, for whom the energetic contribution to pregnancy and lactation is high. Nevertheless, many questions about the costs of reproduction among humans remain unanswered. When are costs of reproduction incurred? How early in women’s lives might we detect such costs? And what biological pathways connect reproductive processes to women’s aging and health? In this talk, I will discuss a major theme of my research, which is aimed at addressing these questions by studying the epigenome, a set of molecular processes associated with gene activity and cellular memory. I will also discuss some of the ways that my collaborators and I are working to understand the broader impact of the social and physical environment on development and the epigenome across the life course. The overarching aim of this research is to shed light on how our evolutionary past and lived experiences in the present come together to shape our biology and health.

Calen Ryan is a human biologist and anthropological geneticist whose work utilizes bioinformatics and computational statistics to analyze high-throughput epigenetic data from large population datasets. His work in the Philippines explores the impact of reproduction on women’s health and aging and the effect of early life socioeconomic exposures on development and health. He is also interested in the role of hypermutable – or ‘junk’ – DNA in evolution and disease, and the intergenerational epigenetic legacy of the paternal preconception environment. The overarching aim of his research is to shed light on how our evolutionary past and lived experiences in the present come together to shape our biology and health.

February 5
Amanda Lea
1PM, ANT 206

February 12
Dorsa Amir
1PM, ANT 206

February 17
Erik Otárola-Castillo
1PM, ANT 206

February 26
Julienne Rutherford
1PM, ANT 206

March 2
Siobhán Mattison
1PM, ANT 206

March 4
Elizabeth Londsdorf
1PM, ANT 206

Lectures, Film Screenings, Events

Symposium
September 6-7
Carol Worthman, Emory
BIG TENT ANTHROPOLOGY
Innovations and applications. A gathering for sharing, connecting, imagining.

Workshop
September 9
Donna Troka, Bayo Holsey
Inclusive Pedagogy2PM, ANT 206

September 12
James Welch
Indigenous peoples in Brazil: Nutrition transition and double
burden of disease
4 PM, ANTH 206

Armelagos Lecture in Biocultural Anthropology
September 20
Khiara Bridges, UC Berkley
The Intersections of Class and Race: Imagining an Ethnography of the Reproductive Lives of Class-Privileged Women of Color
2:30pm, ANTH 303

In this talk, Bridges will draw from her previous work with poor, pregnant women of color to discuss how class and race interact with -- and alter -- one another in the lives of wealthier, pregnant women of color in the United States.

Khiara M. Bridges is a professor in the School of Law at University of California, Berkeley. She is a leading scholar of race, class, reproductive rights, and the intersection of the three. Her scholarship has appeared or will soon appear in the Harvard Law ReviewStanford Law Review, the Columbia Law Review, the California Law Review, and the Virginia Law Review, among others. She is the author of three books: Reproducing Race: An Ethnography of Pregnancy as a Site of Racialization (2011); The Poverty of Privacy Rights (2017); and Critical Race Theory: A Primer (2019). She is also a coeditor of a reproductive justice book series that is published under the imprint of the University of California Press.

She graduated as valedictorian from Spelman College, receiving her degree in three years. She received her JD from Columbia Law School and her PhD, with distinction, from Columbia University’s Department of Anthropology. While in law school, she was a teaching assistant for the former dean, David Leebron (Torts), as well as for the late E. Allan Farnsworth (Contracts). She was also a member of the Columbia Law Review and a Kent Scholar. She speaks fluent Spanish and basic Arabic and is a classically trained ballet dancer.

Khiara M. Bridges is a professor in the School of Law at University of California, Berkeley. She is a leading scholar of race, class, reproductive rights, and the intersection of the three. She received her JD from Columbia Law School and her PhD, with distinction, from Columbia University’s Department of Anthropology.

Department of Anthropology Colloquium
September 27
Fran Markowitz, Ben-Gurion University
Edenic Veganism and Righteous Black Male Bodies in the African Hebrew Israelite Community's Kingdom of Yah
2:30pm

Dr. Markowitz (Ben Gurion University, Israel) is a cultural anthropologist whose field research has taken her to the Russian Jewish immigrant communities of New York City and Chicago in the USA, and to Jerusalem and Mitzpe Ramon in Israel, and then to post-Soviet Russia. Intrigued by the overlapping issues of diaspora, racialization and millenarianism, she has also conducted fieldwork among the African Hebrew Israelite Community in Israel and in the US. In addition, Fran has worked for over two decades on an urban ethnography of Sarajevo. Her key to maintaining an active research agenda is a passion that combines intellectual curiosity with the desire to contribute to a more socially just, life-affirming world.

Symposium
October 4
Peggy Barlett
Educator, Researcher, and Engaged Scholar: Celebrating a Career of Distinction
Jones Room, Woodruff Library, 1:00-5:30pm

October 16
Careers in Anthropology
Info Session for Undergraduates
Undergraduate students are invited to join Anthropology department chair Dr. Jim Rilling for a discussion about career pathways for Anthropology majors.  We’ll share tips, resources, and what we have learned from our alumni, and hope to hear about your questions and needs to help us shape additional career-related programming throughout the year.  Also, we’ll have yummy milk and fresh-baked cookies from Just Bakery!
Please RSVP so we know how many people to expect, and to share your questions in advance.  Hope to see you there!
4:00-5:00pm, Anth 206

Department of Anthropology Colloquium
October 18
Mary Moran, Colgate University
Men Under the Bed: Escaping the War Machine and Reinventing Masculinity in Post-Conflict Liberia

Mary H. Moran is Professor of Anthropology and Africana and Latin American Studies and holds the Arnold A. Sio Chair in Diversity and Community at Colgate University, where she is serving as Interim Director of the Program in Africana and Latin American Studies. Her published works include Civilized Women:Gender and Prestige in Southeastern Liberia (Cornell University Press, 1990), Liberia:The Violence of Democracy (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2006), and recent articles in African Studies Review, Anthropological Quarterly, Journal of International Women's Studies, and Annual Review of Anthropology. She was a member of the Emergency Ebola Anthropology Network which responded to the 2014-15 outbreak of Ebola Virus Disease in the Guinea Coast region of West Africa, for which she consulted with the United Nations Children's Fund and the World Health Organization, and has contributed to public outlets such as Current History and the blog Africa Is A Country. Her current project is a book on the renegotiation of gender in post-conflict Liberia, based in part on 90 interviews with men who avoided violence over the course of the fourteen-year civil war. She is also developing a new comparative project on settler colonialism in Liberia and South Africa.

Department of Anthropology Colloquium
November 8
Holly Dunsworth, University of Rhode Island
This View of Wife: How Woman’s Evolution Challenges Traditional Narratives of Man’s

Here we question assumptions about the evolution of sex differences in human biology, specifically regarding sex differences in height and in pelvic dimensions, which have featured prominently in human evolutionary science since its origins. While the anatomy and physiology of human reproduction differ between the sexes, the effects of hormones on skeletal growth do not. Greater estrogen produced by ovaries causes bones in female bodies to fuse before males’ resulting in sex differences in adult height. Female pelves expand more than males’ due to estrogen and relaxin produced and employed by the tissues of the pelvic region and potentially also due to greater internal space occupied by female gonads and genitals. Evolutionary explanations for skeletal sex differences (aka sexual dimorphism) that focus too narrowly on big competitive men and broad birthing women must account for evolutionary developmental approaches that complicate, weaken, and challenge traditional thinking. In this case, dichotomizing skeletal and life history evolution into Mayr’s proximate-ultimate categories may be impeding  progress in human evolutionary science, as well as perpetuating the popular misunderstanding and abuse of it.

Holly Dunsworth is Associate Professor of Anthropology at the University of Rhode Island. After starting her career performing field- and lab-based paleontological work on the paleoenvironment and functional anatomy of fossil apes, she is now investigating the energetics of nonhuman primate pregnancy and lactation to answer questions about the evolution of human reproduction, growth, and development. She’s behind the EGG hypothesis for the timing of human birth (contra the ‘obstetrical dilemma’); she argues that ‘reproductive consciousness’ is a uniquely human trait of significance; and she is working to expand the dominant evolutionary explanations for sex differences in human height and pelvic dimensions.

January 22
Marcela Benítez
Cooperation, Conflict, and the Mechanism of Social Decission-making in Nonhuman Primates
1PM, ANT 206

Dr. Benítez's research program examines how nonhuman primates make decisions in their social world, what factors impact these choices, and ultimately why these decisions are adaptive. She approaches these questions from an evolutionary perspective while utilizing a mechanistic approach, through the integration of experimental paradigms in the wild, and the analysis and manipulation of hormone profiles. In this talk, she focuses on decision-making during cooperation and conflict, two situations in which making the wrong choice can have significant fitness consequences. First, she examines how wild gelada males make the most informed decisions during conflict. Second, she discusses how conflict influences cooperative decisions (i.e., parochial altruism) in capuchin monkeys, and the role of hormones in promoting cooperation during conflict. Third, she discusses her future goals to examine the evolutionary roots and biological underpinnings of parochial altruism, comparing decision-making during conflict across the primate taxa in both captivity and in wild. By combining the best aspects of naturalistic field work, highlighting the emergence of social challenges, and the best aspects of tightly controlled experiments, highlighting the mechanisms of social choices, here research offers a promising avenue for understanding the importance of sociality, cooperation, and conflict on primate cognitive evolution.

Dr. Marcela E. Benítez (PhD Univ. of Michigan) is Postdoctoral Fellow at Georgia State Univ. She is also the co-director of the Capuchins de Taboga Field Station, a long-term research project studying the cognition and behavior of wild white-faced capuchins in the Taboga forest reserve of Costa Rica. 

Anthropology Co-Sponsored Lectures and Events

October 10
Angie Heo, University of Chicago
Doing Fieldwork in Revolutionary Times
12:30-2:00pm, Callaway S501

In stories from the field, adapting to unexpected conditions is nearly a rite of passage for anthropologists. But what does this celebrated trope of ethnographic authority mean when a country undergoes radical political transformation and against all conventional wisdom? Drawing on materials from Egypt that precede the 2011 revolution and follow the 2013 coup, this talk reflects on the limits and strategies of writing ethnography for the political present.

Conference
December 5-7, 2019
Archival Lives - The Violence of History and the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade
Emory University Conference Center
Conference Organizers: Adriana Chira (History), Clifton Crais (African Studies/History), Walter Rucker (African American Studies/History)

Class-related Lectures, Panels, and Film Screenings

Graduate Teaching Roundtables


Teaching Roundtable 3 – Teaching 101
Date: January 31, 2020
Facilitators: Katy Lindquist, Peter Little
Speakers: TBD
Topics
How do you teach an introductory course in such a broad field?
Are there particular “classic” readings we should assign?
What is a good textbook, and what makes a good textbook?
What do you do if you have to teach a subfield with which you are unfamiliar?
Should you teach it four-field? Biocultural?

Teaching Roundtable 4: Ethics: Touch Subjects in Teaching
Date: February 14, 2020
Facilitators: Brynn Champney, Kristin Phillips
Speakers: TBD
Topics: TBD

Graduate Presentations

Academic Year 2019-20 Graduate Events

 

Graduate Events