Upcoming Events


Thursday March 23rd, 2017

Film Screening & Filmmaker Q/A
Voices of Muslim Women from the US South
By Maha Marouan and Rachel Raimist, 7:30pm, White Hall 205

Thursday, April 6, 2017

Eric Smadja (Société psychanalytique de Paris)
Cosponsored with the Emory University Psychoanalytic Institute, the Atlanta Psychoanalytic Society, and the Center for Mind, Brain, and Culture
"Freud, Durkheim and Mauss: About symbolism and symbolization"
4:00 PM, ANT 206


Dr. Eric Smadja is a psychiatrist, a psychoanalyst, a member of the Société psychanalytique de Paris and of the International Psychoanalytical Association, and a couples psychoanalyst. He works both in Paris and London. He is also an anthropologist, an associate member of the American Anthropological Association and a member of the Society for Psychological Anthropology. In 2007, he was awarded the International Psychoanalytical Association’s Prize for “Exceptional Contribution made to Psychoanalytical Research”.

Dr. Smadja’s works are pluri and interdisciplinary in nature and his current research deals with: “Freud, Durkheim and Mauss: on Symbolism and Symbolization.” His books include Laughter (Le Rire) 1993, 2011, English edition; The Oedipus Complex, Crystallizer of the Debate between Psychoanalysis and Anthropology (Le complexe d’Œdipe, cristallisateur du débat psychanalyse/anthropologie), 2009, forthcoming English edition June 2017 ; The Couple: A Pluridisciplinary Story (Le Couple et son Histoire) 2011, English edition 2016; Couples in Psychoanalysis (Ed.) (Couples en psychanalyse), 2013; Freud and Culture (Freud et la Culture), 2013; and Contemporary Couples (2016), waiting for a publisher.

Lectures, Film Screenings, Events

Thursday, April 6, 2017

Eric Smadja (Société psychanalytique de Paris)
Cosponsored with the Emory University Psychoanalytic Institute, the Atlanta Psychoanalytic Society, and the Center for Mind, Brain, and Culture
"Freud, Durkheim and Mauss: About symbolism and symbolization"
4:00 PM, ANT 206


Dr. Eric Smadja is a psychiatrist, a psychoanalyst, a member of the Société psychanalytique de Paris and of the International Psychoanalytical Association, and a couples psychoanalyst. He works both in Paris and London. He is also an anthropologist, an associate member of the American Anthropological Association and a member of the Society for Psychological Anthropology. In 2007, he was awarded the International Psychoanalytical Association’s Prize for “Exceptional Contribution made to Psychoanalytical Research”.

Dr. Smadja’s works are pluri and interdisciplinary in nature and his current research deals with: “Freud, Durkheim and Mauss: on Symbolism and Symbolization.” His books include Laughter (Le Rire) 1993, 2011, English edition; The Oedipus Complex, Crystallizer of the Debate between Psychoanalysis and Anthropology (Le complexe d’Œdipe, cristallisateur du débat psychanalyse/anthropologie), 2009, forthcoming English edition June 2017 ; The Couple: A Pluridisciplinary Story (Le Couple et son Histoire) 2011, English edition 2016; Couples in Psychoanalysis (Ed.) (Couples en psychanalyse), 2013; Freud and Culture (Freud et la Culture), 2013; and Contemporary Couples (2016), waiting for a publisher.

Monday March 20th, 2017

Join us for a screening of:
THE BURNING An Untold Story from the Other Side of the Migrant Crisis
By Isabella Alexander (Emory, Visiting Professor, and PhD, 2016) 4:00 PM, ANT 206

Monday, February 20, 2017

Louis Alvarado (Assistant Professor, SUNY-Albany)
"An Integrative and Comparative Analysis of Testosterone’s Functional Role in Men’s Life History and Health"
4:00 PM, ANT 206
Across vertebrate species, the steroid hormone testosterone is fundamental to the expression of male life histories. An accumulation of evidence suggests that testosterone is involved in strategically mediating life history trade-offs in such a manner as to optimize allocation of finite resources and maximize reproductive success. Here, I investigate posited functions of testosterone as put forward within competing models of men’s life history. Care is taken to situate these findings within the broader primate context, including preliminary comparative analysis of human and chimpanzee data. Although steroid hormone physiology and function are largely conserved among vertebrates, I develop an argument that distinctive features of the human life course moderate putative effects of testosterone on men’s phenotype. This line of research also has practical implications for contemporary issues in population health, and I will conclude by extending this theoretical framework to examine population variability in incident rates of prostate cancer, an androgen-sensitive disease.

Luis Alvarado is interested in the expression of men’s steroid physiology across the life course, and its influence on behavioral, morphological, and health aspects of male phenotype. He conducts field research at an agricultural village located within the Polish Carpathian Mountains. He uses non-invasive hormone sampling procedures to examine interactions between aging, testosterone levels, work demands, parenting effort, and musculoskeletal function. In a complementary line of research, he examines comparative endocrinology across human societies to identify socioecological factors that contribute to observed disparities in prostate cancer risk. His overall research agenda is centered around critical evaluation and formal testing of prevailing life history and disease models, with the express aim of further stimulating productive debate regarding the role of testosterone in men’s reproductive ecology and health.

Monday, February 13, 2017

Christen Smith (Associate Professor, UT-Austin)
“No. Humans. Involved”: Blackness, Citizenship and National Belonging in the Americas"
4:00 PM, ANT 206

The Black Lives Matter movement has thrust the question of blackness and citizenship to the forefront of our national politics, forcing us to ask why it seems that blackness marks the body as inherently killable. Yet, gendered, racialized state violence is not just a national issue. It is a global crisis that particularly afflicts our hemisphere, revealing political and theoretical conundrums concerning race, social inequality and social justice that are not only urgent but also critical to our collective survival. This transnational politics is rooted in our shared history in the Americas. Race – as a social, historical and political formation – continues to define not only the kind of citizenship we have access to but also who can be recognized as ‘citizen’ and on what terms. Focusing on Brazil as a case study, this talk will examine the politics of gender, race, citizenship and nation from an anthropological perspective. What are the discourses of citizenship that locate gendered blackness outside of the boundaries of national belonging in the Americas? What do contemporary black social movements reveal about the transnational dimensions of this political moment? How can anthropology contribute to these discussions?

Friday, February 10, 2017

Savannah Shange (ABD, Africana Studies & Education, Culture and Society, University of Pennsylvania)
"#OurLivesMatter: Blackness and Belonging in a Progressive Dystopia"
3:00 PM, ANT 206

In recent years, social movements in the US have brought attention to the racialized dimension of law enforcement, whether framed as detention and deportation targeted toward Latina/o immigrants, or policing and prisons aimed at Black Americans. The crisis of policing coincides with the advent of austerity measures that result in budget cuts to health care, education, and the broader non-profit sector, causing those bearing the brunt to wonder if their lives matter.  How, though, are the daily practices of social justice movements shaped by racialized carceral logics?  This talk addresses these questions through an examination of the locally situated practices of progressive institutions and their relationship to the logics of antiblackness and punition. Through a multi-sited ethnography of schools and non-profits, I engage the city as a progressive dystopia, a perpetually colonial place that marks the frontier of both the national imagination and the late liberal project.   The racialized politics of belonging in the City by the Bay reveal the possibilities and limits of social activism within the context of state-funded progressivism, and offer insights for applied anthropology in the context of the shifting landscape of US national politics.

Savannah Shange is an urban anthropologist who works at the intersections of race, place, sexuality, and the state. She is currently a joint doctoral candidate in Africana Studies and Education, Culture and Society at the University of Pennsylvania, and is the recipient of research fellowships from the Ford, Jack Kent Cooke, and Point Foundations. Her research interests include social movements, ethnographic ethics, urban inequality, and the anthropology of the African diaspora.

Monday, February 6, 2017

Urban Anthropology Colloquium
Jemima Pierre (UCLA) and Austin Zeiderman (London School of Economics)
4:00 PM, ANT 206

Jemima Pierre (Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin) is a sociocultural anthropologist whose research and teaching interests are located in the overlaps between African Studies and African Diaspora Studies and engage three broad areas: race, racial formation theory, and political economy; culture and the history of anthropological theory; and transnationalism, globalization, and diaspora. She is the author of The Predicament of Blackness: Postcolonial Ghana and the Politics of Race (Winner of the 2014 Elliot Skinner Book Award in Africanist Anthropology; long listed for the 2013 OCM - BOCAS Literary Prize; Recipient for the 2012 Bevington Fund First Book Grant). She is currently completing a book, Race and Africa: Cultural and Historical Legacies, which is under contract with Routledge Press (“Framing 21st Century Social Issues Series”). At the same time, she has an ongoing ethnographic research project that focuses on historical and contemporary resource extraction in Ghana as a way to think through the relationship of race and political economy in the African postcolony. Dr. Pierre’s essays on global racial formation, Ghana, immigration, and African diaspora theory and politics have appeared in a number of academic journals including, Cultural Anthropology, Feminist Review, Social Text, Identities, Cultural Dynamics, Transforming Anthropology, Journal of Haitian Studies, Latin American Perspective, American Anthropologist, Philosophia Africana, and Politique Africaine.

Friday, February 3, 2017

Su’ad Khabeer (Assistant Professor, Purdue)
"Classic Men: Hip Hop, Black Dandyism and the Racial Formations of Terror"
3:00 PM, ANT 206

In this talk, Su’ad Abdul Khabeer examines the sartorial practice of Muslim Dandyism and explores connections between aesthetics, revolutionary ideologies, and the discourses of terrorism. Dr. Khabeer discusses how some Muslim men are using the aesthetic principles of Black Dandyism to challenge two related racial logics: mainstream discourses of Black pathology and anti-Black racism in US Muslim Communities. She also looks at this sartorial practice against the backdrop of post-9/11 terrorism discourses to chart how shifting styles of dress from the 1990s to the present are connected to geopolitical configurations and the war on terror. Dr. Khabeer argues that in this context, Muslim Dandies respond to a third parallel racial logic—the racial formations of the War on Terror.

Anthropology and African American Studies, Purdue University) is a scholar-artist-activist who uses anthropology and performance to explore the intersections of race, religion and popular culture. Her latest work, Muslim Cool: Race, Religion and Hip Hop in the United States (NYU Press 2016), examines how intersecting ideas of Blackness and Muslim identity challenge and reproduce the meanings of race in the United States. Dr. Khabeer bridges art and the academy in her one-woman solo performance, Sampled: Beats of Muslim Life and is also founding director and senior editor of www.sapelosquare.com, the first website dedicated to the documentation and analysis of African American Islam. She has written for Ebony Magazine, The Atlantic, The Washington Post, The Root, The Huffington Post and has appeared on Al Jazeera English. 

Monday, January 30, 2017

Ryan Jobson (ABD, Anthropology, Yale)
"Deepwater Sovereignty: Extractive Speculation and Postcolonial Futures in Trinidad and Tobago"
4:00 PM, ANT 206

Jemima Pierre (Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin) is a sociocultural anthropologist whose research and teaching interests are located in the overlaps between African Studies and African Diaspora Studies and engage three broad areas: race, racial formation theory, and political economy; culture and the history of anthropological theory; and transnationalism, globalization, and diaspora. She is the author of The Predicament of Blackness: Postcolonial Ghana and the Politics of Race (Winner of the 2014 Elliot Skinner Book Award in Africanist Anthropology; long listed for the 2013 OCM - BOCAS Literary Prize; Recipient for the 2012 Bevington Fund First Book Grant). She is currently completing a book, Race and Africa: Cultural and Historical Legacies, which is under contract with Routledge Press (“Framing 21st Century Social Issues Series”). At the same time, she has an ongoing ethnographic research project that focuses on historical and contemporary resource extraction in Ghana as a way to think through the relationship of race and political economy in the African postcolony. Dr. Pierre’s essays on global racial formation, Ghana, immigration, and African diaspora theory and politics have appeared in a number of academic journals including, Cultural Anthropology, Feminist Review, Social Text, Identities, Cultural Dynamics, Transforming Anthropology, Journal of Haitian Studies, Latin American Perspective, American Anthropologist, Philosophia Africana, and Politique Africaine.

Ryan Cecil Jobson is a doctoral candidate in the combined degree program in Anthropology and African American Studies at Yale University. He holds a B.A., summa cum laude, Phi Beta Kappa, in Africana Studies and Anthropology from the University of Pennsylvania, where he was selected as a Mellon Mays Undergraduate Fellow and Ronald E. McNair Scholar. As an historical and political anthropologist, his research is principally concerned with the relationship between extractive resource capitalism and postcolonial sovereignty in the Americas. His dissertation, "Fueling Sovereignty: Energy, Infrastructure, and State Building in Trinidad and Tobago," is a political ethnography of oil and gas development in the twin-island Caribbean petrostate. Additionally, his broader research interests include the history of anthropology theory and genealogies of anthropological thought in the Caribbean and African Diaspora. His writing is featured in Current Anthropology, Anthropology of this Century, CounterPunch, and Postcolonial Networks, and he is the obliged recipient of multiple grants and fellowships from the Ford Foundation, National Science Foundation, Social Science Research Council, Fulbright U.S. Student Program, and MacMillan Center for International and Area Studies.

Friday, January 27, 2017

Justin Hosbey (PhD, Anthropology, University of Florida)
"Charter Schools, Black Social Life, and the Refusal of Death in Post-Katrina New Orleans"
3:00 PM, ANT 206

In the wake of Hurricane Katrina’s devastation in 2005, the Louisiana State legislature fired over 7,000 New Orleans educators and administrators. The state then immediately ordered the conversion of all New Orleans public schools into privately managed charter schools. Using insights from 16 months of ethnographic fieldwork in two working class Black communities in New Orleans, this presentation examines Black sociality in post-Katrina New Orleans by exploring the social consequences of this privatization of the city’s public school system. This project elucidates the ways that collective trauma and social memory of state retrenchment after previous environmental catastrophe influence the expressive culture and subjectivities of Black residents, informing their critiques of school privatization and anti-Black state violence. Also explored is the way that local activists invoke the cultural memory of historical Black insurgency in New Orleans to stimulate contemporary political mobilization and create new cartographies for the future of Black life in the city. This talk also uses spatial analysis to interrogate how the elimination of traditional neighborhood schools has fractured important social and economic bonds across the city, hastening the removal of Black social life from post-Katrina New Orleans by causing many Black families to become unmoored from neighborhoods where they had previously thrived. Drawing on these observations, this analysis deepens anthropological understandings of the relationship between race, urban space, and neoliberalism by arguing that the privatization of public schools is one tactic of a specifically anti-Black political-economic project that maintains its coherence through the dispossession and obliteration of Black New Orleanians from the city.
Justin Hosbey received his B.A. from Georgia State University in 2008 and his PhD in cultural anthropology with a certificate in digital humanities from the University of Florida in the fall of 2016. He also proudly served as graduate coordinator for the African American History Project at the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program at the University of Florida. His research is informed by perspectives from urban and political anthropology, Critical Black Studies, and cultural geography. He explores Black social life in the U.S. Gulf South and Mississippi Delta regions, focusing on the ways that southern Black communities articulate insurgent modes of citizenship that demand the interruption of racial capitalism.

Monday, November 21, 2016

Department Colloquium
Liza Moscovice (Emory)
"Insights into the social relationships of female bonobos and implications for understanding the evolution of cooperation"
4:00 PM ANT 206

Humans are distinguished from other primates in part by the flexibility and scale of their cooperation, which extends beyond relatives and close friendships and facilitates forms of group-level collective action. Human-level cooperation is mediated by a range of cognitive and emotional adaptations that facilitate collaboration towards shared goals. In this talk, Dr. Moscovice will present evidence that some of these adaptations are also present in our closest phylogenetic relatives, and that understanding variation in social relationships among non-human primates can provide insights into possible evolutionary pathways leading to human-level cooperation. She will summarize prior research on social relationships across a range of primate social systems, from cooperatively-breeding family groups of tamarin monkeys to matrilineal social groups of baboons. She will then highlight her recent research measuring the behavioral and physiological mediators of social relationships among female bonobos, one of our closest phylogenetic relatives. Data were collected over three years from a long-term study site at LuiKotale, Democratic Republic of Congo. Dr. Moscovice developed preference indices to measure the strength of social relationships among females, explored which factors influence females’ choice of social partners and tested whether variation in social relationships predicts patterns of cooperation. Results demonstrate how female bonobos maintain flexible, cooperative relationships outside of kinship with a broad range of partners, suggesting some parallels with humans.

Liza R. Moscovice is a postdoctoral fellow working with Dr. Adrian Jaeggi in the Anthropology Department at Emory. Her research interests are in the biological bases of social relationships and cooperation. Her methods have integrated observational and experimental approaches with non-invasive genetic and hormonal sampling to characterize social relationships across a broad range of primate species and social systems. She received her PhD in psychology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Prior to her current position, she was based at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, where she initiated a long-term study of the behavioral endocrinology of social relationships among wild female bonobos. She also has prior teaching experience as a visiting assistant professor at Binghamton University.

Tuesday, November 8, 2016

Public Anthropology Presentations: Indigenous Peoples of N. America
by Debra Vidali's ANT 280  class
10:00-11:15, ANT 206

What about: Native Americans in Georgia? Columbus Day? Cultural Appropriation? Sports Mascots? Land Rights? Treaties? Erased Histories? Please join us for a lively morning learning about the web-based projects created by students in the Indigenous Peoples of North America course. Projects will explore public education & social justice applications on a spectrum of topics, including Native American histories, identities & present day controversies.

Monday, November 7, 2016

Department Colloquium
Christen Smith (University of Texas, Austin)
Afro-Paradise: Performance, Race, Violence and the Black Body in Times of Terror
4:00 PM ANT 206

The systematic, state-sponsored and rampant killing of black people by the police is currently a critical political issue in our nation. However, anti-black policing is not unique to the United States, and cannot be simply understood as a socio-political phenomenon. In order to fully understand lethal, anti-black, policing we must frame it as a performance that has diasporic dimensions. This presentation examines the crisis of anti-black police violence in Brazil and the movement to end it, paying particular attention to the performative and performatic contours of anti-black police violence as a genre and black Brazilians’ use of performance to attempt to disrupt it.

Christen Anne Smith is Associate Professor of Anthropology and African and African Diaspora Studies at The University of Texas at Austin and Director of Student Programs at the Lozano Long Institute for Latin American Studies (LLILAS). She received her bachelor’s degree in anthropology from Princeton University and her Ph.D. in cultural and social anthropology from Stanford University. Her primary areas of interest are performance, race, gender, violence and the black body in the Americas with a particular emphasis on transnational black liberation struggles and racial formation in Brazil. Her book, Afro-Paradise: Blackness, Violence and Performance in Brazil (University of Illinois Press, 2016) explores economies of violence and the Black body in pain as an ironic transfer point for the production of Brazil’s racial state.

Christen’s research on race, violence, performance and blackness in Brazil has received funding from the Ford Foundation, the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation and the SSRC-Mellon Foundation. She has published essays in American Anthropologist, Cultural Anthropologist, Transforming Anthropology, Souls, the Journal of Latin American Cultural Studies, Latin American-Perspectives and the Latin American performance studies journal E-Misferica. Christen has also published op-eds in The Conversation, The Huffington Post, The American Prospect, Truth-Out, and The Feminist Wire in addition to being featured on BBC’s World Have Your Say, Pacifica Radio, and in the Brazilian magazine Caros Amigos.

Monday, October 17, 2016

Department Colloquium
Antonio Silva (University College, London)
The Evolution of Cooperation & Conflict - A case study of Catholics and Protestants in Northern Ireland
4:00 PM ANT 206

This talk will describe a series of empirical studies testing theories on the evolution of cooperation. It will focus on investigating the role of inter-group conflict and religion, and determining how ecological and individual characteristics affect the variation in cooperative behaviour. These studies are based on naturalistic measures of cooperation - donations, lost letters, dropped coins and lost person experiments - to quantify the variation in the cooperative behaviour of two endogamous groups with an on-going and long history of violent conflict - Catholics and Protestants in Northern Ireland - in a wide range of neighbourhoods in Belfast.

Monday, October 3, 2016

Department Colloquium
Kristin D. Phillips (Emory)
Subsistence Citizenship: Claims-making, Code-switching, and the Politics of Food in Tanzania
4:00 PM ANT 206

This paper examines how people living in a drought-prone and geographically marginal part of Tanzania—Singida Region—experience their ongoing challenges to subsistence and how they engage, produce, sustain, and survive the rural Tanzanian state and each other in the age of democracy and development. Drawing on ethnographic data collected between 2004 and 2014, and on the particular case of the 2006 East African food crisis, I trace the social life cycle of subsistence grains—millet, sorghum, and maize—as they circulate from person to person, household to household, and state to citizen. I argue that food’s capacity to hold many contiguous meanings—and people’s use of these to pursue life and livelihood—allows food to transcend fixed codes of distribution and to follow unpredicted paths. The paper highlights the creative energy of both citizens and state as they engage in these politics of subsistence that seek to prompt, resist, or redirect redistributive efforts. It underscores villagers’ oscillation between the idioms of rights and patronage, arguing that it is this political code-switching that allows rural Singidans to capture as much of the state and subsistence as they do.

Monday, September 19, 2016

Department Colloquium
Carol Greenhouse (Princeton)
Citizens United / Citizens Divided:  A Case Study in the Anthropology of Law
4:00 PM ANT 206

Citizens United, a case decided by the U.S. Supreme Court in 2010, concerned revisions to campaign finance law. The Court’s ruling resulted in controversy that remains intense today. But the significance of Citizens extends beyond the technicalities of campaign finance, as the social reasoning in the opinion is spelled out in terms far broader than the electioneering context alone.  The text of the ruling, together with its cited precedents, shows the Court grappling with questions familiar to anthropologists – the nature of the individual, the social qualities of corporate groups, the means and ends of communication, the meaning of citizenship and the purpose of democracy. The lecture offers a reading of the opinion from the standpoint of its social reasoning, and, beyond that case study, explores some of its implications (of theory and method) for anthropologists.

Monday, September 12, 2016

Department Colloquium
Liv Nilsson Stutz (Emory)
A Taphonomy of Ritual Practice. Reconstructing mortuary practice in the deep past. Examples from the Mesolithic
4:00 PM ANT 206

Anthropology Co-Sponsored Lectures and Events

October 27

Food, Genes, & Culture
Gary Paul Nabhan
5:00 PM Lecture ANT 303 / 6:00 PM Reception & Book Signing ANT 206
For free tickets, visit http://nabhan.eventbrite.com

Presented by the Center for the Study of Human Health, Dining Services, Office of Sustainability, Turner Environmental Law Clinic, Dept of Anthropology, Dept of Environmental Sciences

Class-related Lectures, Panels, and Film Screenings

Friday, September 30

Sustainable Food Fair
Presented by ANT 386
10:30 am - 1:00 pm, Cox Hall Bridge

Enjoy educational tables, a farmers market and entertainment showcasing the sustainable food movement in Atlanta.  A student-led tradition, the Fair is the product of a one-credit class that teaches students the backstage skills and strategies to put on this much-enjoyed event.  Students will read The Omnivore’s Dilemma in preparation, become specialists in one topic related to sustainable food in Atlanta, and work with farmers, chefs, and local organizations to put on the event with music, costumes, and educational tables.  Students are responsible for teeshirt and poster design, street layout, publicity materials, feedback analysis, and creative educational experiences for Fair attendees.

Thursday, September 29

Film Screening: The Medicine Game by Lukas Korver
Hosted by Dr.Debra Vidali's ANT 280 class "Indigdnous Peoples of North America"
7:00 PM, ANT 303

Tuesday, September 20

Film Screening: Club Native: How Thick is Your Blood? by Tracey Deer (2008)
Hosted by Dr.Debra Vidali's ANT 280 class "Indigdnous Peoples of North America"
7:00 PM, ANT 303

Graduate Teaching Roundtables

Friday, October 21

Ethics: Microagressions and Implicit Bias
3:15 PM / ANT 206

Friday, November 11

Teaching Anthropology 101
2:30 PM / ANT 206

Friday, February 17

Creating a Syllabus
2:30 PM / ANT 206

Friday, March 17

IRB Session
2:30 PM / ANT 206

Graduate Presentations

Friday, March 3, 2017, 3pm

Dissertation Presentation by Gabriella Sheets

“The Developmental Ecology of the Infant Microbiome”

Friday, April 7, 2017, 3pm

Dissertation Prospectus Presentation by Daniel Thompson

Friday, April 14, 2017, 2:30 pm

Dissertation Prospectus Presentations by Elena Lesley and Kathy Trang

Friday, April 21, 2017, 2:30 pm

Dissertation Prospectus Presentation by Kaitlin Banfill

Friday, April 28, 2017, 2:30 pm

Dissertation Presentation by Hilary King

"Kernels of Connection: Economy, Biodiversity, and Cultural Identity in Oaxaca's Heirloom Maize Networks"

Friday, May 5, 2017, 2:30 pm

Dissertation Presentation by Whitney Easton

"Pulling up the Grapevine: The Changing Face of Family Farming in Central Italy"

Graduate Events