Upcoming Events

October 1
Connections in Anthropology
Hilary King
12-1pm, Zoom

The Connections in Anthropology series is geared toward helping undergraduate students make sense of anthropology and its connections to professional pathways, postgraduate training, personal development, and public activism and engagement.  Sessions will be moderated by Dr. Kristin Phillips, our Director of Undergraduate Studies.

This session will feature Dr. Hilary King (17G), an applied anthropologist and sustainable food advocate who serves as the Assistant Director of Emory’s Master’s in Development Practice, and as a Special Projects Consultant at Community Farmers Markets (CFM). She completed her doctoral degree in Cultural Anthropology at Emory University.  Since 2001, Hilary has worked with farmers and foodmakers across Latin America, East Africa, and the U.S., testing out ways for farmers to earn more money and for consumers to get to know more about what they eat. Her work examines how social relationships shape economic interactions, particularly around food. She has worked as a researcher, waitress, business advisor and chief of farmer relations.

Before coming to Emory, Hilary worked in the fair trade and direct trade coffee industries, running her own company and advising cooperatives. She is interested in how people connect to one another in an increasingly globalized world and how these connections affect our understanding of responsibility within global communities. Her work has been supported by Thomas J. Watson and Fulbright Fellowships. She also makes great chocolate chip cookies and handmade tortillas.

RSVP in Handshake.

 

October 4
Colloquium
The Moral Triangle: Germans, Israelis, Palestinians
Sa'ed Atshan, Emory University
Katharina Galor, Brown University
2:30pm, Anthropology 303

Drs. Atshan and Galor will present the results of their joint research project on Germans, Israelis, and Palestinians in Berlin, Germany. They will show how the relationships among these populations stem from narratives surrounding moral responsibility, the Holocaust, the Israel/Palestine conflict, and Germany’s recent welcoming of Middle Eastern refugees. Highlighting their interlocutors’ experiences, memories, and hopes, they will demonstrate the myriad ways in which migration, trauma, and contemporary state politics are inextricably linked.

Dr. Katharina Galor is the Hirschfeld Senior Lecturer in Judaic Studies at Brown University, where she is affiliated with the Center for Middle East Studies and the Center for Urban Studies. Dr. Galor is an art historian and archaeologist specializing in the visual and material culture of Israel-Palestine. She received her B.A., M.A. and Diplôme d’Études Approfondi in Art History and Archaeology from the Université d’Aix-Marseille in France and her Ph.D. in Old World Art and Archaeology from Brown University. Her publications include The Archaeology of Jerusalem: From the Origins to the Ottomans (co-authored with Hanswulf Bloedhorn; Yale University Press, 2013), Finding Jerusalem: Archaeology Between Science and Ideology (University of California Press, 2017), and, with Sa’ed Atshan, The Moral Triangle: Germans, Israelis, Palestinians (Duke University Press, 2020). She is currently writing Jewish Women: Portraits of Conformity and Agency, a project supported by a grant from the Leo Baeck Institute, Berlin.

Dr. Sa’ed Atshan is acting Associate Professor of Anthropology at Emory University. He is the author of Queer Palestine and the Empire of Critique (Stanford University Press, 2020). Atshan is also the coauthor, with Katharina Galor (Judaic Studies, Brown University), of The Moral Triangle: Germans, Israelis, Palestinians (Duke University Press, 2020). His forthcoming book, Paradoxes of Humanitarianism: The Social Life of Aid in the Palestinian Territories, is under contract with Stanford University Press in their Anthropology of Policy Series. Dr. Atshan has recently embarked on two new research projects. “Can the Subaltern Quaker Speak?: Alienation and Belonging among Black and Palestinian Friends” studies the convergent and divergent experiences of African-American and Palestinian Quakers, with an emphasis on the intersection of race and Christianity in the United States and Israel/Palestine. The other, “Queer Imaginaries and the Re-Making of the Modern Middle East,” is in collaboration with Phillip Ayoub (Diplomacy and World Affairs, Occidental College), researching LGBTQ activism across the Middle East and North Africa region.

Lectures, Film Screenings, Events

 

October 4
Colloquium
The Moral Triangle: Germans, Israelis, Palestinians
Sa'ed Atshan, Emory University
Katharina Galor, Brown University
2:30pm, Anthropology 303

 

September 13
Colloquium
Lance Gravlee
No Race Without Racism: Why Social Constructionism Isn’t Enough
2:30 PM
ANT 303

 

 

 

Anthropology Co-Sponsored Lectures and Events

Carlos Modeum Exibit Each/Other: Marie Watt and Cannupa Hanska Luger

September 24, 12:00pm, conversation with Marie Watt and Cannupa Hanska Luger, John Lukavic (Denver Art Museum), and Megan E. O'Neil (Emory), at Carlos Museum Ackerman Hall, followed by a sewing circle for students on the Quad.

September 24, 1:00-4:00pm, Sewing Circle for Students, led by Marie Watt. On Emory Quadrangle. No sewing experience necessary!

September 26, 12:00, Artist Talk by Marie Watt about her artistic practice, at Carlos Museum Ackerman Hall, followed by a sewing circle for the public (and students) on the Quad.

September 26, 1:00-4:00pm, Sewing Circle for all, led by Marie Watt. On Emory Quadrangle. No sewing experience necessary!

Class-related Lectures, Panels, and Film Screenings

Graduate Teaching Roundtables

Graduate Presentations

Graduate Events